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df



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PostSubject: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Sun Sep 09, 2012 9:08 am

University of Missouri Receives USDA Grant to Increase Cattle Breeding Efficiency
University of Missouri, 9/4/2012

Columbia, MO-Each year, in the state of Missouri, cattle ranchers breed 2 million cows.

Yet, only about 85 to 90 percent of those cattle actually birth a calf.
The other cows either are not able to get pregnant or they miscarry.
Now, the USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture has awarded a $3 million grant to University of Missouri researchers to determine if specific genes play a role in the breeding problems and other issues in the cattle industry.

Finding the answers could lead to a significant increase in income for farmers and also stabilize prices at the grocery store.

"In Missouri alone, we're talking about 100,000 cows that are not able to sustain a pregnancy," said Jerry Taylor, Wurdack Chair in Animal Genomics in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

"We're hoping to identify the individual genes in up to 200 cattle from up to 10 different breeds to determine which genes are the troublemakers - which genes are responsible for early termination of these pregnancies.
"It's important that we broaden this work to include other breeds of cattle and not just Angus cattle, so that our work will have implications for farmers throughout the country."

Taylor and Dave Patterson, a professor of animal science and state beef extension specialist at MU, will lead the research team as they attempt to identify, or "sequence," the 24,000 genes in each animal.
The researchers will be looking for mutations in the genetic code that lead to early embryonic loss.

Scientists also could use this basic sequence information to address feed efficiency, disease resistance and growth.

"Typically an animal has two copies of a gene, so that if one gene is unable to function due to a mutation, the second gene functions normally and keeps the animal in a healthy state," Patterson said.
"However, when both copies of a gene are mutated so that they cannot function, the effect may be lethal and the embryo will fail to implant or will terminate during gestation.

"If we can find those problem mutations, we can develop a solution. It's just tough to find a solution when you don't know the problem you're facing."

Taylor said the grant builds on research previously conducted or currently underway at MU supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Kent Powell



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Sun Sep 09, 2012 9:40 am

Isn't a cow that is unable to reproduce also unable to pass on her problem? Perhaps the problem lies in using technology which allows cows without the ability to calve regularly to be mass produced. What technology made us wish to mass produce cows which cannot reproduce regularly?
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PatB



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Sun Sep 09, 2012 9:40 am

UC Davis in california has been working on this challenge.
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Grassfarmer



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Sun Sep 09, 2012 10:03 am

Wonder what percentage is caused by environmental factors rather than genetic?
I like the justification "Finding the answers could lead to a significant increase in income for farmers and also stabilize prices at the grocery store." More like increase or stabilize the income of the research facility.
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Kent Powell



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Sun Sep 09, 2012 10:19 am

I have actually been asked by a concerned individual about my decision to not annually fertility test the herd bull battery. I have found that infertile bulls lack ability to pass it on, expecially with competition. The herd will sort them. Allow nature to do what it will do when left alone. Beef cattle are closer to nature than any other major source of food- except when it comes to producing "Superior" seedstock.
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LCP



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Sun Sep 09, 2012 10:59 pm

Kent Powell wrote:
I have actually been asked by a concerned individual about my decision to not annually fertility test the herd bull battery. I have found that infertile bulls lack ability to pass it on, expecially with competition. The herd will sort them. Allow nature to do what it will do when left alone. Beef cattle are closer to nature than any other major source of food- except when it comes to producing "Superior" seedstock.

I agree that an infertile animal lacks the ability to pass on it's infertility. My bigger concern however is whether or not an infertile, yet dominant bull keeps other fertile bulls from getting the job done. I've got some pastures with three bulls in them, one older and two younger. I would rather not take the chance of the older bull shooting blanks and keeping the younger ones at bay in the mean time. Maybe it's an unfounded fear but it only takes one less open cow to pay for all the semen checking. Maybe infertile bulls are not typically dominant? In a mixed age bunch of bulls I'm not going to take the chance. Just my take.


The research sounds ambitious, but agree that environment plays too big a role for genetic testing to take the place of, or else everyone would be DNA testing already.
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jonken



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Sun Sep 09, 2012 11:19 pm




The research sounds ambitious, but


Here's a wallhanger . Jon
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jonken



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Sun Sep 09, 2012 11:29 pm

[quote="df"]University of Missouri Receives USDA Grant to Increase Cattle Breeding Efficiency
University of Missouri, 9/4/2012

Columbia, MO-Each year, in the state of Missouri, cattle ranchers breed 2 million cows.



"It's important that we broaden this work to include other breeds of cattle and not just Angus cattle, so that our work will have implications for farmers throughout the country."



I am SO glad the Angus breed is not being singled out . Jon
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jonken



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Sun Sep 09, 2012 11:53 pm

df wrote:
University of Missouri Receives USDA Grant to Increase Cattle Breeding Efficiency
University of Missouri, 9/4/2012

Columbia, MO-Each year, in the state of Missouri, cattle ranchers breed 2 million cows.

Yet, only about 85 to 90 percent of those cattle actually birth a calf.
The other cows either are not able to get pregnant or they miscarry.
Now, the USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture has awarded a $3 million grant to University of Missouri researchers to determine if specific genes play a role in the breeding problems and other issues in the cattle industry.


"If we can find those problem mutations, we can develop a solution. It's just tough to find a solution when you don't know the problem you're facing."


May I be the first resident of Missouri to contribute a butchers knife and steel to the appropriated $3 mil. as to eliminate these dysfunctional GENES . Jon


Where is RUDOLPH when we need guidance? Jon
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Kent Powell



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Mon Sep 10, 2012 1:54 am

How many infertile dominant bulls have you found?


LCP wrote:
[
I agree that an infertile animal lacks the ability to pass on it's infertility. My bigger concern however is whether or not an infertile, yet dominant bull keeps other fertile bulls from getting the job done. I've got some pastures with three bulls in them, one older and two younger. I would rather not take the chance of the older bull shooting blanks and keeping the younger ones at bay in the mean time. Maybe it's an unfounded fear but it only takes one less open cow to pay for all the semen checking. Maybe infertile bulls are not typically dominant? In a mixed age bunch of bulls I'm not going to take the chance. Just my take.


The research sounds ambitious, but agree that environment plays too big a role for genetic testing to take the place of, or else everyone would be DNA testing already.
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LCP



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:22 am

Only a couple that I can recall. It also allows us to catch other things as well. This year we had two with hair rings, one was real bad and would likely have prevented him from getting anything done. I guess I don't know enough about hair rings, maybe some are more suceptible to them than others? I guess I'd rather know before turning them out, whether I use them or not. Another bull was found to have a degenerative testicle that was not apparent by just visual inspection. I would rather find that out before breeding season and sell him rather than hope the fertile bulls cover for him. I guess I don't see semen checking the same as some other reproductive technologies that cover up inadequacy, like fooling around with hormones and such. To me it seems like a faster way to expose the inadequacy. Why keep a subfertile or infertile bull around for 4 or 5 years, expecting that he's getting some cows bred, when you could check to know for sure? It's easy to visually tell if a cow is fertile - she has a calf. If she doesn't have a calf, you sell her. Why not do the same with a bull, dominant or otherwise? By selling a subfertile or infertile bull, I can recoup all my semen checking costs in feed savings alone, not counting the possibility of more opens.

On average, there is one bull out of 20 that fails for some reason each year in our herd. Some are treatable (hair rings), some are not (deformed tails).

I am not saying everyone ought to semen check. If your cows are getting bred to your satisfaction, great. For me it makes sense to do it. I don't think its a stretch to see that it can pencil out pretty well.


Kent Powell wrote:
How many infertile dominant bulls have you found?


LCP wrote:
[
I agree that an infertile animal lacks the ability to pass on it's infertility. My bigger concern however is whether or not an infertile, yet dominant bull keeps other fertile bulls from getting the job done. I've got some pastures with three bulls in them, one older and two younger. I would rather not take the chance of the older bull shooting blanks and keeping the younger ones at bay in the mean time. Maybe it's an unfounded fear but it only takes one less open cow to pay for all the semen checking. Maybe infertile bulls are not typically dominant? In a mixed age bunch of bulls I'm not going to take the chance. Just my take.


The research sounds ambitious, but agree that environment plays too big a role for genetic testing to take the place of, or else everyone would be DNA testing already.
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Kent Powell



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Mon Sep 10, 2012 9:33 am

I have only had a couple old bulls with low fertility (by test) in quite a few years. They were far from dominant.

We had 5-10% not pass when we were tryin gto have impressive weights. Growing out young bulls slower on grass eliminated almost all problems with fertility testing- including rings.


LCP wrote:
Only a couple that I can recall. It also allows us to catch other things as well. This year we had two with hair rings, one was real bad and would likely have prevented him from getting anything done. I guess I don't know enough about hair rings, maybe some are more suceptible to them than others? I guess I'd rather know before turning them out, whether I use them or not. Another bull was found to have a degenerative testicle that was not apparent by just visual inspection. I would rather find that out before breeding season and sell him rather than hope the fertile bulls cover for him. I guess I don't see semen checking the same as some other reproductive technologies that cover up inadequacy, like fooling around with hormones and such. To me it seems like a faster way to expose the inadequacy. Why keep a subfertile or infertile bull around for 4 or 5 years, expecting that he's getting some cows bred, when you could check to know for sure? It's easy to visually tell if a cow is fertile - she has a calf. If she doesn't have a calf, you sell her. Why not do the same with a bull, dominant or otherwise? By selling a subfertile or infertile bull, I can recoup all my semen checking costs in feed savings alone, not counting the possibility of more opens.

On average, there is one bull out of 20 that fails for some reason each year in our herd. Some are treatable (hair rings), some are not (deformed tails).

I am not saying everyone ought to semen check. If your cows are getting bred to your satisfaction, great. For me it makes sense to do it. I don't think its a stretch to see that it can pencil out pretty well.


Kent Powell wrote:
How many infertile dominant bulls have you found?


LCP wrote:
[
I agree that an infertile animal lacks the ability to pass on it's infertility. My bigger concern however is whether or not an infertile, yet dominant bull keeps other fertile bulls from getting the job done. I've got some pastures with three bulls in them, one older and two younger. I would rather not take the chance of the older bull shooting blanks and keeping the younger ones at bay in the mean time. Maybe it's an unfounded fear but it only takes one less open cow to pay for all the semen checking. Maybe infertile bulls are not typically dominant? In a mixed age bunch of bulls I'm not going to take the chance. Just my take.


The research sounds ambitious, but agree that environment plays too big a role for genetic testing to take the place of, or else everyone would be DNA testing already.
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LCP



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:27 pm

It's interesting that you don't have hair rings now. What do you attribute that to? Less riding activity on grass vs. drylot I suppose? I think you're right about development having a big impact on fertility. Come to think of it, our home-raised bulls (which isn't many) seldom if ever fail a semen test - they aren't developed on grass, but definitely pushed less than our purchased bulls.

Dumb question but I have to ask - your decision not to semen check is economic then? It doesn't pay for you since so few failed in the past? Sounds that way to me, just want to clarify.

I am envious of your confidence in your stock Kent...here's hoping one day I will trust my cattle to do what they are supposed to Smile

Kent Powell wrote:
I have only had a couple old bulls with low fertility (by test) in quite a few years. They were far from dominant.

We had 5-10% not pass when we were tryin gto have impressive weights. Growing out young bulls slower on grass eliminated almost all problems with fertility testing- including rings.


LCP wrote:
Only a couple that I can recall. It also allows us to catch other things as well. This year we had two with hair rings, one was real bad and would likely have prevented him from getting anything done. I guess I don't know enough about hair rings, maybe some are more suceptible to them than others? I guess I'd rather know before turning them out, whether I use them or not. Another bull was found to have a degenerative testicle that was not apparent by just visual inspection. I would rather find that out before breeding season and sell him rather than hope the fertile bulls cover for him. I guess I don't see semen checking the same as some other reproductive technologies that cover up inadequacy, like fooling around with hormones and such. To me it seems like a faster way to expose the inadequacy. Why keep a subfertile or infertile bull around for 4 or 5 years, expecting that he's getting some cows bred, when you could check to know for sure? It's easy to visually tell if a cow is fertile - she has a calf. If she doesn't have a calf, you sell her. Why not do the same with a bull, dominant or otherwise? By selling a subfertile or infertile bull, I can recoup all my semen checking costs in feed savings alone, not counting the possibility of more opens.

On average, there is one bull out of 20 that fails for some reason each year in our herd. Some are treatable (hair rings), some are not (deformed tails).

I am not saying everyone ought to semen check. If your cows are getting bred to your satisfaction, great. For me it makes sense to do it. I don't think its a stretch to see that it can pencil out pretty well.


Kent Powell wrote:
How many infertile dominant bulls have you found?


LCP wrote:
[
I agree that an infertile animal lacks the ability to pass on it's infertility. My bigger concern however is whether or not an infertile, yet dominant bull keeps other fertile bulls from getting the job done. I've got some pastures with three bulls in them, one older and two younger. I would rather not take the chance of the older bull shooting blanks and keeping the younger ones at bay in the mean time. Maybe it's an unfounded fear but it only takes one less open cow to pay for all the semen checking. Maybe infertile bulls are not typically dominant? In a mixed age bunch of bulls I'm not going to take the chance. Just my take.


The research sounds ambitious, but agree that environment plays too big a role for genetic testing to take the place of, or else everyone would be DNA testing already.
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Kent Powell



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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Tue Sep 11, 2012 8:08 am

I also don't think the process does anything to improve the relationship between a bull and his caretaker. Anytime I can avoid putting a group of old bulls in a pen, chute or a trailor, I do.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Increase cattle breeding efficiency   Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:11 am

the only redeeming comparison for the waste of this 3 million was watching MO play GA in football and thinking the football coaches were probably making 2 million...

we`re going to fire our 2 million man soon I suspect for losing though he be good enough coach, when we should keep him and lower his salary to what he is worth...a few thousand over high school pay...

http://www.kentucky.com/2012/09/11/2332717/john-clay-if-harvard-duke-and.html
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