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PostSubject: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Wed Jul 04, 2012 9:41 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Wed Jul 04, 2012 9:53 pm

Marian is one of my oldest and dearest friends and customers. She has been buying bulls from us for over 20 years now. This is tough to see. We went down today (the fire is about 60 miles south of us) and took her a Honda side x side and a few other things but it's pretty bleak. It is well over 200,000 acres as of this morning and still going strong although today has been a good break for them. Cooler weather and alot less wind so they are hopefully making some head way on it today. We usually don't get this kind of fire danger until Aug. so it's going to be along summer. Fire is like drought though if you can survive the first couple of years after them it makes everything better but the first years are pretty tough sledding.

Jack praying for rain.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Wed Jul 04, 2012 10:02 pm

all these newspapers want us to pay to read them...Ithought they were public service agencies

Jack,
what precautions must you take routinely to prevent starting a fire ?
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Wed Jul 04, 2012 10:38 pm

What a contast in years between this year and the last. While at last years gathering my deal was absolutely as good as it could get, I'm guessing your place will be at about the worst it could be. Here on the flats the grass has pretty much just melted and the hoppers are getting or are going to get all the old grass. Its pretty hard to see a neighbor hurting like that. I hope everything will work out for those folks. Here on the birthday of our great country I have to beleive it was folks like her that made it as great as it is, and it would be hard to imagine her not pulling through. I hope all of us out west here don't burn this year but don't doubt it could happen.

Ben Loyning, in the vicinity of being a proud American.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Wed Jul 04, 2012 11:02 pm

Jack McNamee wrote:
http://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/montana/article_6d5af4c5-e9c2-5944-afd5-182140d8f8f3.html#.T_SdIDDhkOE.email

I'll see if this works. Jack
OVERNIGHT REPORT: ASHLAND — Fire crews working on the 204,000-acre Ash Creek fire east of here spent Tuesday strengthening fire lines in advance of a cold front that made already-rough fire conditions — including near triple-digit temperatures and humidity levels in the single digits — worse with gusts of 25 to 35 mph.

The lightning-caused fire, reported on June 26, has blackened miles of property and burned nearly 20 homes between Ashland and Broadus. It is 55 percent contained.

Fire officials have continually described the fire’s behavior as erratic and have often kept crews out of its direct path because of its speed and intensity.

“When you have that kind of erratic fire behavior going, you don’t want to take any risks,” said Pat McKelvey, fire information officer. “We want to keep them safe.”

The cold front caused winds to shift, and by 3:45 p.m. the fire “once again responded to weather conditions and is very active,” McKelvey said.

It began moving along northeastern edge in the Beaver and Green Creek areas and on the southwestern edge near Threemile and Tobin creeks.

While fire crews chased flames and put out hot spots, Marian Hanson and her family spent the day surveying and starting to repair the damage at the Double H Ranch, off of East Fork Otter Creek Road.

Since 1959, Hanson, 79, has lived on the property — homesteaded in 1916 by the grandparents of her late husband, Darrel. On Friday, the fire raged through her property, destroying three homestead houses, cattle pasture, a garage with four vehicles, an airplane hangar, numerous corrals and about 150 tons of hay.

“This is the most destruction I’ve ever seen out here, and I’ve been here for 61 years,” Hanson said. “It’s a mess. I don’t know where to start.”

Her house was unharmed, thanks to a neighbor’s advice to put sprinklers on the roof as the fire approached. As she stood 50 yards away at the top of her driveway and watched the flames swallow buildings, whole chunks of land and leave twisted and charred debris behind, she wasn’t sure if she’d have a home when all was said and done.

“They told me that my house had made it through, but I couldn’t see it through the smoke,” she said. “Pretty soon the smoke went up and there was the house, safe and sound.”

The ranch also lost about a half-dozen cattle in the fire. Hanson is looking for the same amount of horses and searching for many more cattle. About 150 tons of hay didn’t burn, and the U.S. Forest Service has found land enough for about 100 animals.

One of her sons, a grandson, several great grandchildren and friends joined Hanson on Tuesday to help cut fence line and sort through the scorched debris.

While there was plenty of damage — she estimated it at about $1 million — Hanson said her spirits were high and that friends and neighbors have been generous in helping out.

“As bad as it looks, it could be worse,” she said. “You’ve got to look at the bright side in these things. Nobody was hurt or killed, the house is here, we’ll recover. We’re trying to get through it as best we can and you’ve to to just get back up and go on.”

Strike teams also were attacking two new fires nearby Tuesday.

“We don’t know much about them yet,” McKelvey said.

Both started east of Fort Howes in the Ashland District of the Custer National Forest. He said one is burning on Indian Creek and the other on Taylor Creek.

Bureau of Land Management crews are doing the initial attack, McKelvey said.

Meanwhile, on the southeast side of the Highway 212, wind is pushing the Ash Creek fire west. The northern portion also made another push at Beaver Creek, where the fire is moving north-northwest.

The Type I incident command team being transferred from the Dahl fire near Roundup to the Horse Creek fire south of Hysham will also take over part of the Ash Creek fire.

The Type II team that has been on the Ash Creek fire will continue to manage firefighting efforts east of the Tongue River. The Type I team will assume control west of the Tongue.

There are now about 600 firefighters working on the fire, with most of them setting up shop at a spike camp — complete with tents for all of the workers, a medical station and a fire information table — near the St. Labre mission in Ashland.

Bernie Pineda, a fire information officer, said most of the people at the outdoor camp are working directly on the fire while administration remains in Colstrip.

“Everybody out there working today will be living here,” he said. “We live very Spartan lives out here but we’re used to it.”

The camp is maintained by a pair of 20-person work crews and and can be planned and constructed in a matter of hours to accommodate more workers.

While meals have been shipped in from Colstrip the past few days, a mobile kitchen is scheduled to arrive soon to cook meals on site.

In Broadus, crews were still working to restore power after it went out about a week ago.

Tongue River Electric Cooperative is busy replacing power poles lost in the Ash Creek fire. A spokeswoman said that Broadus could be back on line later Tuesday.

Gazette reporter Lorna Thackeray contributed to this report.


Read more: http://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/article_6d5af4c5-e9c2-5944-afd5-182140d8f8f3.html#ixzz1zj1fhzJ2

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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Wed Jul 04, 2012 11:41 pm

MKeeney wrote:
all these newspapers want us to pay to read them...Ithought they were public service agencies

Jack,
what precautions must you take routinely to prevent starting a fire ?

Lightning is our biggest worry followed closely by human activity. Catalytic convertors are bad if people pull of the road into the grass and flat tires on the highway by semi's always start a few but we tend to get alot of lightning this time of year and that starts most of them. The Ash Creek fire went from 10,000 ac to 110,000 acres in one night because of the wind. I'll post a few pictures we took going down there today. Jack
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Thu Jul 05, 2012 12:00 am

Wow, just hard to imagine being in the path of one of those large fires unable to do anything to protect your cattle, buildings or land. Bad enough being in a severe drought situation with all the worries that brings. Hope it works out OK for all the folks facing this threat. Take care.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Thu Jul 05, 2012 1:25 am

Jack McNamee wrote:
MKeeney wrote:
all these newspapers want us to pay to read them...Ithought they were public service agencies

Jack,
what precautions must you take routinely to prevent starting a fire ?

Lightning is our biggest worry followed closely by human activity. Catalytic convertors are bad if people pull of the road into the grass and flat tires on the highway by semi's always start a few but we tend to get alot of lightning this time of year and that starts most of them. The Ash Creek fire went from 10,000 ac to 110,000 acres in one night because of the wind. I'll post a few pictures we took going down there today. Jack

Jack i know just what you are dealing with. This is quite common in our area so far 13 fires all caused by man. Cigarette butts out the window are real common along the freeway. The other list toppers you have mentioned. but we found a new one last week they have these exploding targets, and some dumbass shot one and sure enough it started a fire. we are in the middle of the driest water year on record. May .14in June .12in Dec 2011 and Nov 2011 ..0.0in Jan feb mar, april all below normal, the only hope we have is nothing grew.The thunder heads started to bulid today. Horses are shod and wire cutters are handy because it is coming and it will be bad real bad. Now to put your big fire into perspective that has burned 320 square miles at this point. By anyone's standards that is huge. Good luck Jack and everyone that has to deal with the lack of moisture.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Thu Jul 05, 2012 8:50 am










A few pictures. Everybody I talked to seems to be doing as good as can be expected. Alot of outfits lost all their grass so the scramble is on to find grass or get the cattle to town. Fences are all burned up so cattle are wandering all over the country which is good. They have a chance to at least find a little feed and water. Most will drift toward home. No numbers yet on how many are dead. A good wet spring and this will look like a garden spot. Fire is a great tool if it just could be a little more controlable but it is what it is. It is still awesome to live in nature. Some times good and some times not so much but still awesome every day.

Jack
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Thu Jul 05, 2012 9:42 am

Thanks for the pics Jack. They tell the tale well. I as you wouldn't trade any of the risk for the life i live. Got hay down and the skies are dark here today just maybe me cutting hay was better than a rain dance.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Thu Jul 05, 2012 12:01 pm

Fire is a good servant; but a dangerous master.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Thu Jul 05, 2012 12:13 pm

Good luck, Jack. We are still rebuilding from a fire, due to an ice storm three years ago. It doesn't fix itself overnight, and without lots of dollar bills to throw at the problem. Of course things fixed with dollar bills really are not problems. It doesn't make them any less fun though. Immediate fire danger has passed here for a few days. Humidity is back up where it is supposed to be, and usually means more rain. The trail of sweat running down my backside keeps the grass growing wherever I go as well. Work up a sweat Jack, and see if it helps.



Bootheel, always helpful
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Fri Jul 06, 2012 4:47 pm

Quote :
4,400 Head of Livestock Displaced, 70 Perished
Northern Ag Network posted on July 06, 2012 14:58 :: 32 Views


According to Dick Deshamps, acting State Director for the Montana Farm Service Agency, 4,400 head of livestock have been displaced so far as the Ash Creek Fire continues to burn in southeast Montana. He adds that there is also one report of 70 head that have perished. These are the most official numbers available at this point but, since they are dependant upon reports from producers, could grow significantly once things get more settled down.

With the need for forage extreme, Dick says that they have now opened up CRP for emergency grazing in both Powder River County and Rosebud County. For more details, please read “Emergency CRP Use Approved in Two MT Counties.”

In the meantime, whether or not the cattle lost will be protected under a livestock loss program is up in the air. The livestock assistance programs that were involved in the 2008 Farm Bill sunsetted in 2011.

Dick says that the Farm Bill being discussed now may or may not retroactively keep those programs.

Dick encourages anyone with livestock displaced or gone to contact your local FSA office. As of Thursday, they hadn’t gotten reports of any displacement or loss from the Dahl Fire.

Not wanting to get political - But in my opinion- these government backed insurance and Disaster assistance like the LIP program is what the Farm Bill should be made up of--- and all the subsidies/payments for just growing/not growing products done away with...
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Fri Jul 06, 2012 6:49 pm

Oldtimer wrote:
Quote :
4,400 Head of Livestock Displaced, 70 Perished
Northern Ag Network posted on July 06, 2012 14:58 :: 32 Views


According to Dick Deshamps, acting State Director for the Montana Farm Service Agency, 4,400 head of livestock have been displaced so far as the Ash Creek Fire continues to burn in southeast Montana. He adds that there is also one report of 70 head that have perished. These are the most official numbers available at this point but, since they are dependant upon reports from producers, could grow significantly once things get more settled down.

With the need for forage extreme, Dick says that they have now opened up CRP for emergency grazing in both Powder River County and Rosebud County. For more details, please read “Emergency CRP Use Approved in Two MT Counties.”

In the meantime, whether or not the cattle lost will be protected under a livestock loss program is up in the air. The livestock assistance programs that were involved in the 2008 Farm Bill sunsetted in 2011.

Dick says that the Farm Bill being discussed now may or may not retroactively keep those programs.

Dick encourages anyone with livestock displaced or gone to contact your local FSA office. As of Thursday, they hadn’t gotten reports of any displacement or loss from the Dahl Fire.

Not wanting to get political - But in my opinion- these government backed insurance and Disaster assistance like the LIP program is what the Farm Bill should be made up of--- and all the subsidies/payments for just growing/not growing products done away with...


Old timer there should be no farm subsidies period. As far as drought and fire go we expect it and buy insurance or plan ahead. Why should the taxpayer foot the bill for your risk??????????????? It is dry allover the country and the fire danger is extreme, these are things I expect to see every year or so. Proper planning prevents piss poor performance every time OT. One man bragged about how high of a price he got for his meadow hay last year and this year he has none and is in one hell of a pickle.You think he is wishing that he should have kept some, Oh but he got to Bragg. I just have a tough time with the sympathy card every time we get in a bind. If you cant feed the cattle sale them they are called a cash cow are they not.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Fri Jul 06, 2012 8:31 pm

it would appear the greatest asset would be a good neighbor like Jack...but then, I know we all have at least one SOB for a neighbor...even our neighbor Smile
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Fri Jul 06, 2012 8:48 pm

W.T wrote:
Oldtimer wrote:
Quote :
4,400 Head of Livestock Displaced, 70 Perished
Northern Ag Network posted on July 06, 2012 14:58 :: 32 Views


According to Dick Deshamps, acting State Director for the Montana Farm Service Agency, 4,400 head of livestock have been displaced so far as the Ash Creek Fire continues to burn in southeast Montana. He adds that there is also one report of 70 head that have perished. These are the most official numbers available at this point but, since they are dependant upon reports from producers, could grow significantly once things get more settled down.

With the need for forage extreme, Dick says that they have now opened up CRP for emergency grazing in both Powder River County and Rosebud County. For more details, please read “Emergency CRP Use Approved in Two MT Counties.”

In the meantime, whether or not the cattle lost will be protected under a livestock loss program is up in the air. The livestock assistance programs that were involved in the 2008 Farm Bill sunsetted in 2011.

Dick says that the Farm Bill being discussed now may or may not retroactively keep those programs.

Dick encourages anyone with livestock displaced or gone to contact your local FSA office. As of Thursday, they hadn’t gotten reports of any displacement or loss from the Dahl Fire.

Not wanting to get political - But in my opinion- these government backed insurance and Disaster assistance like the LIP program is what the Farm Bill should be made up of--- and all the subsidies/payments for just growing/not growing products done away with...


Old timer there should be no farm subsidies period. As far as drought and fire go we expect it and buy insurance or plan ahead. Why should the taxpayer foot the bill for your risk??????????????? It is dry allover the country and the fire danger is extreme, these are things I expect to see every year or so. Proper planning prevents piss poor performance every time OT. One man bragged about how high of a price he got for his meadow hay last year and this year he has none and is in one hell of a pickle.You think he is wishing that he should have kept some, Oh but he got to Bragg. I just have a tough time with the sympathy card every time we get in a bind. If you cant feed the cattle sale them they are called a cash cow are they not.

I agree- thats what I was saying- get rid of the subsidies- Keep the insurance programs...A year ago when we had the winter from Hell followed by months of flooding and thousands of calves died from one of the two, was the first time I even realized the LIP program existed... Some folks got some pretty fair money for all their calf loses in the snowstorms... I had a tough time accepting March, April, and May snow storms as an unexpected disaster (which I thought was what the LIP was supposed to be for)... I actually thought it was lined out for major cattle losses due to something like Foot and Mouth where a herd had to be destroyed... As far as insurance--Can you get fire insurance on leased pasture that is public owned lands?
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Fri Jul 06, 2012 11:05 pm

Can't have it both ways OT it is or it is not. I guess if the subsidy fit's your needs it is good if it don't it has to go???????????????? kinda the pot calling the kettle black OT.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Fri Jul 06, 2012 11:40 pm

W.T wrote:
Can't have it both ways OT it is or it is not. I guess if the subsidy fit's your needs it is good if it don't it has to go???????????????? kinda the pot calling the kettle black OT.

Question
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Fri Jul 06, 2012 11:51 pm

If the Gov is backing it Ot it is a subsidy.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Sat Jul 07, 2012 12:07 am

W.T wrote:
If the Gov is backing it Ot it is a subsidy.

So then buying flood or grazing insurance is a subsidy? Both are monitored by and backed by federal funding...
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Sat Jul 07, 2012 12:31 am

You got it OT - finally cheers
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Sat Jul 07, 2012 12:38 am

Grassfarmer wrote:
You got it OT - finally cheers


cheers cheers cheers cheers
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PostSubject: some-of-what-you-might-see-at-this-years-gathering   Sat Jul 07, 2012 5:31 am

The fire seems pretty bad.

In 1988 our place went up in smoke. Several things we wish we would have done different.

1. Just sold the cows. We ended up finding grass a long ways away, everything pretty much didn't work out good with that, burned up lots of equity trying to hold on. Could have used equity to later on to build back.

2. Picked rock in places for future haying. Right after a fire, I am sure picking rocks is very low on the priority list however, every year we say man we should have picked alot of this after the fire.

3. Installed waddles or erosion control on major creeks that feed dams. Had a big rain about 2 years after the fire. The ash, twigs, unburned stuff filled a couple of dams made a real mess.

4. Make an effort to spend time with family. There not to high on priority list, but should be.

5. There really is nothing that you can do. Accept that there in really no way you can fix this.

6. Seems like after you lose everything in a fire, you are more apt not to risk more afterward. Take more risk afterword, build back faster with equity saved from selling out now.

Thats my two cents of doom and gloom.
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Sat Jul 07, 2012 6:36 pm

Jack--Our Valley County "Long Run" Asst Fire Chief just posted on FB that he is part of a 4 man crew and 2 attack trucks that are down south working on the fires... He said they are on the Tyler Fire near Broadus (I hadn't heard of that one)... Wolf Point and Circle also have a truck and a 2 man crew each there too according to him..
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PostSubject: Re: Some of what you might see at this years gathering,   Mon Jul 09, 2012 9:38 pm

Quote :
RSS Emergency CRP Grazing Approved in 6 MT Counties

Northern Ag Network posted on July 09, 2012 17:03 :: 96 Views


Drought conditions in Montana have prompted an announcement from Montana’s Farm Service Agency that “emergency grazing” will be allowed in six counties. Producers in Rosebud, Beaverhead, Big Horn, Custer, Madison, and Yellowstone counties will be able to graze their CRP this year with a payment reduction. If a contract holder doesn’t have the need to graze this year, they can lease the grazing privileges for the amount up to the payment reduction to other producers in need. Approval does need to be obtained by the FSA office and any grazing of CRP will restart the contract holder’s 3-year rotation..


© Northern Ag Network 2012
Haylie Shipp

http://www.northernag.net/AGNews/tabid/171/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/7168/Emergency-CRP-Grazing-Approved-in-6-MT-Counties.aspx

An article by "my girlfriend" of the Northern Ag Network.. I run cows in an about 5000 acre community pasture with her Dad- and besides having spent hours working cattle with her- and watching what a cowgirl she is- love to hear her on the radio...
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