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Mean Spirit



Posts : 321
Join date : 2010-09-26

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Fri Sep 16, 2011 6:52 pm

And when the Charolais deal comes to fruition the calves are going to be a lot better than those calves?

MS, in the vicinity of expectations, hoping not too high.
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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Fri Sep 16, 2011 7:24 pm

They better be Wink

I talked to my buyers about my plans before I went ahead with the flushes... they pay a premium for what I am presently doing but are even more interested with the systematic silvers in the making.

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Mean Spirit



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PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Fri Sep 16, 2011 8:07 pm

Very good. They'll definitely be more silver. If we hold our ground on non-color traits, I think you'll be good.

MS, feeling better now.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Fri Sep 16, 2011 8:21 pm

good stuff Hilly..yelp, the pressure is on John...but seeing grass underneath the "genetics" always is a positive sign of future satisfaction...
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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Sat Sep 17, 2011 4:33 pm

Made it out to the summer calving groups this morning to find this bull busted up and another in tough shape...







34G has left me some hard working daughters the oldest being 37 first calf heifers, these three are a average sample of them.









Not as fancy as the first calvers I posted last year on 5 bar but in my experience I fully expect this type to last longer even though they are down more in condition.

He left me around 110 daughters so far plus whatever he manage to breed this year up until now.


.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Sat Sep 17, 2011 11:05 pm

Craig,
Are some of these destined for parent stock use for producing herd sires?
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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Sat Sep 17, 2011 11:32 pm

For in herd use yes, until the flush mob is on stream... all 37 were bred to the A-789 and I had 31 heifers and 6 bulls from that breeding and those bulls will be used as a mob next year. My plan is once the flush population is up and running all future bulls will be from that closed full sib population nucleus and they will be used over my more mongrelized but still close maternal population if that make any sense No Rolling Eyes

As you know I would have bred more this way this year but A-789 is out of commission and so 34G and a mob of his sons as well as some other Shoshone bulls were all running with my maternal herd.
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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Sun Oct 02, 2011 12:45 am








We covered over 1500 acres this week, about 2500 done to date so we are starting on the downhill side next week Sleep cheers


.
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RedBulls



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Join date : 2011-01-07
Location : Corvallis, MT

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Tue Oct 04, 2011 5:36 pm

Thanks for sharing Craig!
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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Thu Oct 06, 2011 11:51 pm



Came across this picture from last summer, thought it was kind of fitting as the little 75 bull behind him is one of the group of sons that replaced him this year.


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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Wed Oct 19, 2011 10:29 am

Hilly wrote:








Sold a pot load of these steers last week... 625# before a 3% shrink for $155.75 cwt Neutral I not complaining but I think I am starting to understand the pressure of selling over priced cattle, as it sure seems to me like the buyer must have high expectations and I’m not sure they can live up to them.

I’m looking forward to the day I can finish all my own cattle... but not sure if that will help the discomfort over making more than enough.
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Grassfarmer



Posts : 850
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Wed Oct 19, 2011 12:42 pm

Not sure I've ever felt that discomfort you are talking about Hilly, but then again I'm all cattle and not pulling off all those fields of black gold like you at the moment Smile I'm real happy with my retail beef business as the customers are so grateful for the service and product we are providing. I'm quite happy with the money too - netting around $1350 for essentially 17 month grassed yearlings. The new reality of cattle prices makes this less attractive though when I know my calves will be worth $1000 as feeders at some point this winter without the workload. Still I guess there is security in having customers that are eager to buy my beef at the price I set through the highs and lows of the cattle cycle.

Grassfarmer, in the vicinity of never feeling discomfort for selling cattle commercially for "too much" money.
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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Wed Oct 19, 2011 1:42 pm

As I type we are combining some "black gold" ... I was going to post a picture of my view but uploading from my phone is more trouble than it is worth. The interesting thing is the gold is in the eye of the beholder as I found out a few weeks ago when a U.S farmer was upset with the yellow weeds that were showing up in his Round Up Ready corn Shocked

I'll try to explan the discomfort deal a little better when I get to the office, the cattle deal has to stand on it's own best we can divide the two on the books.

But as I sit here in a combine awating test results on this feild, discomfort is high as the opening pass down the middle averaged 88 bushel at $14 a bushel...

I have my hands full expanding the cows Smile

Although the some of the discomfort my be due to the fact I haven't left this seat for two days Laughing
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Grassfarmer



Posts : 850
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Wed Oct 19, 2011 2:50 pm

I wonder if your John Deere dealer or fertiliser dealer have these feelings of discomfort? scratch
I see you are keeping busy as I travel that stretch of highway pretty regular this time of year.
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Tom D
Admin


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Age : 38
Location : Michigan

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Wed Oct 19, 2011 4:30 pm

88 bushels @$14/bushel, holy schnikes. Maybe that discomfort is a pinched nerve from sitting on your wallet. If it helps you deal with the guilt, you can buy the first round at the next gathering.
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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Thu Oct 20, 2011 11:10 am

The first thing I thought when those calves sold excessively, is how was the buyer going to fair especially with the added risk of live stock over other commodities.

I don’t feel guilty about excessive income, but I do get uncomfortable as sticking to budgets and curbing the urge to move things around on the priority list gets amplified. There are so many things I think I would like to provide for my family but on further inspection unnecessary, that list always seem to suddenly grow in over abundant times with an ease that is nonexistent in the inverse.

I realize this is a cattle forum not parenting 101, but as a kids my brother and I had the job of feeding the calves twice a day at the dairy farm, around school age we started to drive to the dairy before and after school (clutching made it a little hard to see over the dashboard) and doing the milking, not a hard job relative to the generations before. We never made an allowance or were paid it was just normal life, one of my uncles came back to the farm and his boys helps out as well but needed to be paid a wage... productivity took a nose dive, in an attempt to fix that wages went up, as wages went up this 10 year olds taste in expensive designer clothing as well as other basic “needs” increased and we all know basic needs have to be met to sustain life.

This has little to do with the price of calves and I’m sure all 5 (are you sure it’s up to 5 Joe?) of you reading this wish I would stop over thinking everything and just enjoy life... Sickness? Defect? Or am I just challenged, there has to be a switch or red button around here somewhere Rolling Eyes
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PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Thu Oct 20, 2011 9:33 pm

Hilly wrote:
The first thing I thought when those calves sold excessively, is how was the buyer going to fair especially with the added risk of live stock over other commodities.

I don’t feel guilty about excessive income, but I do get uncomfortable as sticking to budgets and curbing the urge to move things around on the priority list gets amplified. There are so many things I think I would like to provide for my family but on further inspection unnecessary, that list always seem to suddenly grow in over abundant times with an ease that is nonexistent in the inverse.

I realize this is a cattle forum not parenting 101, but as a kids my brother and I had the job of feeding the calves twice a day at the dairy farm, around school age we started to drive to the dairy before and after school (clutching made it a little hard to see over the dashboard) and doing the milking, not a hard job relative to the generations before. We never made an allowance or were paid it was just normal life, one of my uncles came back to the farm and his boys helps out as well but needed to be paid a wage... productivity took a nose dive, in an attempt to fix that wages went up, as wages went up this 10 year olds taste in expensive designer clothing as well as other basic “needs” increased and we all know basic needs have to be met to sustain life.

This has little to do with the price of calves and I’m sure all 5 (are you sure it’s up to 5 Joe?) of you reading this wish I would stop over thinking everything and just enjoy life... Sickness? Defect? Or am I just challenged, there has to be a switch or red button around here somewhere Rolling Eyes


Just as I suspected. You are in need of counseling. It just so happens I am on the council of elders, and your membership dues are 60 days past due. I would love to help you, and do have the answers, but as I have more bills than money, collection day is at hand. Please remit all premiums to the Bootheel Council of Elders and Youngers, to have these problems disappear.


Bootheel, here to help
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Grassfarmer



Posts : 850
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Thu Oct 20, 2011 10:01 pm

I see the points you are making and they are all logical enough. Given the disjointed way the industry works with different competing sectors as Dylan posted on another thread tonight I honestly don't have a lot of qualms enjoying every last cent on feeder cattle. Given how brutal this last cattle cycle has been in Canada, made worse by BSE and a closed US border I think it's probably fair to say most cow-calf guys will have lost money about 7 years out of the last 9. Not so bad for those of us with a tighter grip on expenses and mainly lower winter feed costs. After the beating guys have taken most could care less if the feedlot, packer or retailer are going to lose out for the next while. Not saying that's right or a healthy situation but I think that's what many people feel.

My Scottish background doesn't make it tough to stick to budgets. As we say "the quickest way to double your money is to take it out of your wallet, fold it in half and put it back in"
I drove 350 miles today to pick up a 80% tread used tractor tire for $275 versus getting a new one in town for $740. Old habits die hard, or maybe they are too well engrained ever to die?

The story you told about getting wages as a kid and the affect of that is a good one. These lessons or experiences we have are what shape us as individuals. I know I am very much shaped by my Grandpa's influence although he died when I was a kid before I had a chance to know him as a farmer. His philosophy was you could be as tough as nails in business but once you had made the money you had the choice of how to spend it. He was always a generous, giving person who quietly supported all kinds of charity and individuals who might be in need and that was an example that my Dad followed and I try to too.

Grassfarmer, trying to keep up the pretence that I'm meaner than that mean guy Mean Spirit.
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Bob H



Posts : 371
Join date : 2011-02-17
Location : SW Idaho

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Thu Oct 20, 2011 10:15 pm

It is interesting to read about 14 dollar a bushel grain and the challenge to raise cattle it comes together with the other thread on grass-finishing cattle. This is all still so new to me as a producer to get more than the budget says but as the population grows and farm land doesn't the future may be vary bright. The price that you quoted on those steers was Canadian what is the exchange rate today.
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Grassfarmer



Posts : 850
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Thu Oct 20, 2011 10:26 pm

The dollars are as near parity as doesn't matter Bob.
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Bob H



Posts : 371
Join date : 2011-02-17
Location : SW Idaho

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Fri Oct 21, 2011 9:54 am

Thanks Ian. It is a better time to be in agricultuure. Lets hope that the cost of goods doesn't eat up the good. We spent about three weeks in Texas buying Cows and they have depleted there cow herd by about half the way I understand and that will take some time to replenish. Just some thoughts while waiting for day light. Bob h
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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Fri Oct 21, 2011 9:05 pm

Bootheel wrote:
Hilly wrote:
The first thing I thought when those calves sold excessively, is how was the buyer going to fair especially with the added risk of live stock over other commodities.

I don’t feel guilty about excessive income, but I do get uncomfortable as sticking to budgets and curbing the urge to move things around on the priority list gets amplified. There are so many things I think I would like to provide for my family but on further inspection unnecessary, that list always seem to suddenly grow in over abundant times with an ease that is nonexistent in the inverse.

I realize this is a cattle forum not parenting 101, but as a kids my brother and I had the job of feeding the calves twice a day at the dairy farm, around school age we started to drive to the dairy before and after school (clutching made it a little hard to see over the dashboard) and doing the milking, not a hard job relative to the generations before. We never made an allowance or were paid it was just normal life, one of my uncles came back to the farm and his boys helps out as well but needed to be paid a wage... productivity took a nose dive, in an attempt to fix that wages went up, as wages went up this 10 year olds taste in expensive designer clothing as well as other basic “needs” increased and we all know basic needs have to be met to sustain life.

This has little to do with the price of calves and I’m sure all 5 (are you sure it’s up to 5 Joe?) of you reading this wish I would stop over thinking everything and just enjoy life... Sickness? Defect? Or am I just challenged, there has to be a switch or red button around here somewhere Rolling Eyes


Just as I suspected. You are in need of counseling. It just so happens I am on the council of elders, and your membership dues are 60 days past due. I would love to help you, and do have the answers, but as I have more bills than money, collection day is at hand. Please remit all premiums to the Bootheel Council of Elders and Youngers, to have these problems disappear.


Bootheel, here to help

Bootheel, I appreciate the generous offer to help, but I’m still reeling from your last attempt to help with my compromising picture phobia. I had decide to give it a go, but still somewhat apprehensive I created my own photobucket account for such photos and proceeded to upload the “weeding my rock garden in shorts with permed hair” I was a little numb as I contemplated actually going through with it, as I tried to log in I was informed that I had been band for violating their TOS. This was a setback to say the least, I decided maybe they required I had a shirt on so I proceeded to paint one on inspired by Mark’s body paint post. Whether or not it was that or the email correspondents, I was eventually reinstated but the trauma had been done Embarassed

I have always been good a dodging the camera and this became apparent as I looked for possible pictures for this supposed therapeutic ritual... I had none even close to as interesting or adventurous as you and Tom posted and found myself wishing I had one of my oh S#!T face my first time sky diving or maybe one of me with a shocked and confused look on my broken face as picked my teeth up off the ice after eating a stick, as these were truly humbling experiences while still manly.

No such luck... pale



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Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Fri Oct 21, 2011 9:47 pm

Hilly wrote:
Bootheel wrote:
Hilly wrote:
The first thing I thought when those calves sold excessively, is how was the buyer going to fair especially with the added risk of live stock over other commodities.

I don’t feel guilty about excessive income, but I do get uncomfortable as sticking to budgets and curbing the urge to move things around on the priority list gets amplified. There are so many things I think I would like to provide for my family but on further inspection unnecessary, that list always seem to suddenly grow in over abundant times with an ease that is nonexistent in the inverse.

I realize this is a cattle forum not parenting 101, but as a kids my brother and I had the job of feeding the calves twice a day at the dairy farm, around school age we started to drive to the dairy before and after school (clutching made it a little hard to see over the dashboard) and doing the milking, not a hard job relative to the generations before. We never made an allowance or were paid it was just normal life, one of my uncles came back to the farm and his boys helps out as well but needed to be paid a wage... productivity took a nose dive, in an attempt to fix that wages went up, as wages went up this 10 year olds taste in expensive designer clothing as well as other basic “needs” increased and we all know basic needs have to be met to sustain life.

This has little to do with the price of calves and I’m sure all 5 (are you sure it’s up to 5 Joe?) of you reading this wish I would stop over thinking everything and just enjoy life... Sickness? Defect? Or am I just challenged, there has to be a switch or red button around here somewhere Rolling Eyes


Just as I suspected. You are in need of counseling. It just so happens I am on the council of elders, and your membership dues are 60 days past due. I would love to help you, and do have the answers, but as I have more bills than money, collection day is at hand. Please remit all premiums to the Bootheel Council of Elders and Youngers, to have these problems disappear.


Bootheel, here to help

Bootheel, I appreciate the generous offer to help, but I’m still reeling from your last attempt to help with my compromising picture phobia. I had decide to give it a go, but still somewhat apprehensive I created my own photobucket account for such photos and proceeded to upload the “weeding my rock garden in shorts with permed hair” I was a little numb as I contemplated actually going through with it, as I tried to log in I was informed that I had been band for violating their TOS. This was a setback to say the least, I decided maybe they required I had a shirt on so I proceeded to paint one on inspired by Mark’s body paint post. Whether or not it was that or the email correspondents, I was eventually reinstated but the trauma had been done Embarassed

I have always been good a dodging the camera and this became apparent as I looked for possible pictures for this supposed therapeutic ritual... I had none even close to as interesting or adventurous as you and Tom posted and found myself wishing I had one of my oh S#!T face my first time sky diving or maybe one of me with a shocked and confused look on my broken face as picked my teeth up off the ice after eating a stick, as these were truly humbling experiences while still manly.

No such luck... pale





I give it a 12 on a 1 to 10 scale of, oh shitman, what were you thinking. You're in like Flynn, and have moved up to Director standing in this illustrious group of whacked individuals. The wife loves it too, as she snorted a little while laughing and pointing at the HAIR and the very classy painted on shirt. Baby blue is sooooo good on you Very Happy Stop Wife has to look again and laugh. Yip still funny, and good for another. I have resigned status as President, and turn all duties over to you.

All hail the King



Bootheel, beaten again, and will never be the best
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Tom D
Admin


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Age : 38
Location : Michigan

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Fri Oct 21, 2011 10:08 pm

Holy Shit. The combine finally cracked him. Craig, I am drinking an actual Molson while giving you a conceptual welcome hug. Joe and I are nothing compared to you and your Umbros. All hail the king.

P.S. You realize, there's no going back now. geek
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Hilly



Posts : 406
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: Fall on the Farm   Fri Oct 21, 2011 11:23 pm

Laughing Laughing You’re all laughing with me.... Neutral right ?? Suspect

The Umbros were sort of an olive branch to Grassy, after giving him a hard time about soccer,, I mean football,, no defiantly soccer Smile

P.S. I’d stay away from the imported oils, bad karma... hearsay
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