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 Winter in winterland

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Grassfarmer



Posts : 850
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Winter in winterland   Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:33 pm

Not wanting to complain too loud for fear of the repercussions but we need some more winter this winter. Got up to 41f one day last week and that moved a lot of our remaining snow. Probably still got more than anywhere else on the prairies but would sure appreciate a top up.
Moved my final fence of the grazing season this morning cheers

Biggest problem is water as these cows are wintering on snow. Works OK as long as they get a fresh break of grass each day but won't work once we start feeding. Having to pump water to another group.

Cows are in OK condition but later weaning didn't let them fatten up as much as usual.


Away in the centre distance a bull moose with a dilemma - he is in the neighbours buffalo paddocks and can't figure out how to escape. Hope he doesn't come through the 8 wire electric or we might get a jurassic park - buffalo edition affraid

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MKeeney
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Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: Winter in winterland   Sun Jan 08, 2012 6:08 pm

I wish all my friends and family that worry so much about snow could see these pics...of course, seldom is there anything under the snow but earth with stocking rates and grazing methods here...
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sanjose



Posts : 20
Join date : 2011-12-13
Age : 57
Location : Williams Lake B.C. Canada

PostSubject: Winter In Wonderland   Mon Jan 16, 2012 12:52 am

Hey Grassfarmer, I will have to take your word on the moose or maybe he left before the shutter closed and hope he got out the same way he got in but Your cows look better than some around here that are on feed. We were trying to make February before starting to feed but have a week of cold weather ahead of us with a fresh 6 inches of snow so far so might have to weaken and start feeding soon. Clint.
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Oldtimer

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Join date : 2010-10-04
Location : Northeast Montana

PostSubject: Re: Winter in winterland   Mon Jan 16, 2012 7:07 am

We're still bare ground here- all the snow melted...But that might change this week...Predicting chances of snow all week... Canadian cold front hit yesterday with howling wind of 40+mph and dropping temps... 5 Below this morning- and predicted 10-15 Below for the mid week...
Really isn't bad for up here in January- but all the nice December weather spoiled me...
Cows still out grazing- altho I'm supplementing them with some hay to make the grass left go longer..
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Grassfarmer



Posts : 850
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Winter in winterland   Mon Jan 16, 2012 10:05 am

Here he is sanjose, needed a bit of zoom but I could see him plain as day.
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sanjose



Posts : 20
Join date : 2011-12-13
Age : 57
Location : Williams Lake B.C. Canada

PostSubject: Winter In Wonderland   Mon Jan 16, 2012 12:55 pm

Thanks for the close-up Grassfarmer, The wolves have eaten most of our moose on this side of the Rockies and I was wanting to see if they still looked the same as I remembered. I was looking at the equipment you are using to graze and notice you use the multi position plastic posts and a couple different colors. Can you elaborate on your choice, and why? I have been doing it here for about three winters now and have found that winter is the time that demands better tools or at least shows the difference between the different types. Also what type of poly do you use and what lengths of run would be your maximum? What reels do you use and how do they stand up in winter? How do you pull the portable posts from the frozen ground? I have learned a thing or two in the last few winters but mostly had to figure it out myself as there aren't any other folks nearby doing this. My tools and methods are probably a little different than yours but I also am hungry to learn other ways of doing and might be able to share info on what works in different situations as well. Hope this isn't too personal and I would also welcome input from other problem graziers.
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Grassfarmer



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Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Winter in winterland   Mon Jan 16, 2012 3:27 pm

sanjose wrote:
Thanks for the close-up Grassfarmer, The wolves have eaten most of our moose on this side of the Rockies and I was wanting to see if they still looked the same as I remembered. I was looking at the equipment you are using to graze and notice you use the multi position plastic posts and a couple different colors. Can you elaborate on your choice, and why? I have been doing it here for about three winters now and have found that winter is the time that demands better tools or at least shows the difference between the different types. Also what type of poly do you use and what lengths of run would be your maximum? What reels do you use and how do they stand up in winter? How do you pull the portable posts from the frozen ground? I have learned a thing or two in the last few winters but mostly had to figure it out myself as there aren't any other folks nearby doing this. My tools and methods are probably a little different than yours but I also am hungry to learn other ways of doing and might be able to share info on what works in different situations as well. Hope this isn't too personal and I would also welcome input from other problem graziers.

There wasn't much methodology to my madness Clint. I don't normally winter fence - we tend to be on bush areas where it's not easy to fence in the winter months so my equipment is really for the April-November/December period. I started with fencing materials from the Coop - polywire, non-geared reels and the plastic posts pictured. As I've done more fencing I've got tired of these things and switched over to power-flex geared reels, gallager step in pig tail posts and aircraft cable. Buying these direct cost me less than the crap stuff I was buying from the Coop and it's a lot nicer to work with.
Really like the aircraft cable although you need a break away on it or these reels disintegrate when a moose or cow hits the line at high speed. Most of my reels have 750 feet on them with a few longer ones for specific fields. The pigtail posts don't get used in the winter as you would need to drill two holes to get them in, that's why I was using the plastics in the picture. Just set them in a little so they were easy to pull back out. I find they are a terrible product, every time you throw a bunch of them in the back of the truck you break some of the wire holders off them. If I went to winter fencing I would maybe go with rebar but Craig will be able to tell you more about winter fencing.
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sanjose



Posts : 20
Join date : 2011-12-13
Age : 57
Location : Williams Lake B.C. Canada

PostSubject: Winter In Winterland   Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:43 am

Thanks for your candor, I was wondering about the multi-wire posts because I have used the Powerflex or Obrien ones and found they work the best out of the plastic options for two reasons. One being that the steel pin is 1/2 the diameter of the feed store posts and goes into the ground as easy as a pig-tail post. They are very flexible while remaining rigid and practically unbreakable but haven't used them in winter. They are helpful when grazing pairs to allow for a lower wire setting when the calves are still very small but not very handy on corners. We mostly use the pig-tail posts too as they are better going around corners and we can weave them together to build saw-horse type structures out of them to hang reels on. We prefer the Speed-rite or powerflex type over the Gallagher ones because the plastic coating on the Gallagher posts are no help when stepping into dry or frozen ground. We use a chordless Makita hammer drill with an 8 inch long by 1/4 inch masonary bit to make pilot holes for the posts in ice or frozen ground and goes very fast. We only need to make two holes if the post is on a corner. I was wondering why you use aircraft cable instead of poly braid? I have heard it is popular over in your province but have not found anyone using it here and am curious about the trend also the breakaway you mention. I have several quarter mile reels that I use almost full length on the paddocks at home. We also have about four 1/2 mile Gallagher reels and use three at a time sometimes to build portable winter fences around the lake we just finished at.
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Grassfarmer



Posts : 850
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Winter in winterland   Tue Jan 17, 2012 3:32 pm

I guess the aircraft cable is popular because its fairly cheap and looks like it will last for ever. It is 1/16th wire comprised of 7x7 strands woven together with a 480lb minimum breaking strain. A 5000' roll is $200 and weights 15kgs or so so it isn't too heavy in the lengths I'm using. I use the Gallagher type handles but instead of attaching them direct to the wire I make a small loop on the end of the wire and tie the handle to that with a little piece of the thinnest big bale twine. Then if a moose (or truck Embarassed )hits the fence the twine breaks instead of the reel. Some might say the visibility isn't good with the cable but my cattle always know just where it is.
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