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df



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PostSubject: Applied Repro strategies   Tue Sep 06, 2011 10:19 pm

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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Tue Sep 06, 2011 10:48 pm

df wrote:
http://www.appliedreprostrategies.com/2011/Joplin/newsroom.html
interesting stuff Dennis...not I`m going to apply any of it Smile
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knabe



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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 12:46 am

at least browse jerry taylor's powerpoint slides.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 5:24 am

knabe wrote:
at least browse jerry taylor's powerpoint slides.
i`ll read it all in time...i just got through the multiple sire dna etc study...I`ve talked to Taylor about dna`ing actual "homozygousity" ; nice , helpful fellow, especially if I would follow through...I would know more, understand more specifics...but after spending my money, I doubt there would be much return...
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Mark Day



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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 7:15 am

I must be going backwards as I hardly ever think of doing AI work anymore and they sure do seem to be pushing the benefits of it. Mentioned early embryonic loss of 6-7% day 28-84 in a dairy herd. Wonder if that is typical for beef cattle on pasture.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 7:25 am

Mark Day wrote:
I must be going backwards as I hardly ever think of doing AI work anymore and they sure do seem to be pushing the benefits of it. Mentioned early embryonic loss of 6-7% day 28-84 in a dairy herd. Wonder if that is typical for beef cattle on pasture.
likely
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PatB



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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:38 am

It would be nice to have the audio file on some of the topics. The summary make loose alot in the writing and understanding of the writer.
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PatB



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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 4:52 pm

A question for those who use multiple sires in a breeding pasture. Do a few bulls sire more than their share of the calf crop as this article states?

http://www.appliedreprostrategies.com/2011/Joplin/proceedings/22van-eenennaam2.pdf
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Mean Spirit



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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 5:06 pm

MKeeney wrote:
df wrote:
http://www.appliedreprostrategies.com/2011/Joplin/newsroom.html
interesting stuff Dennis...not I`m going to apply any of it Smile

Drugs, semen, consultation services, feed additives, and genetic testing services are marketed very effectively by this kind of meeting. I think this kind of meeting has a lot to do with those industries, not so much to do with better cattle. I'm afraid we made too many animal scientists some time ago.

MS, in the vicinity of my 1988 American Society for Animal Science Scholarship Award.
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whitecow



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Age : 48
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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 5:29 pm

patb wrote:
A question for those who use multiple sires in a breeding pasture. Do a few bulls sire more than their share of the calf crop as this article states?

http://www.appliedreprostrategies.com/2011/Joplin/proceedings/22van-eenennaam2.pdf

I worked with a large commercial operator in the NW a couple of years ago and found a similar distribution of calves per sire. We looked at about 4000 calves from a single breeding season. Some bulls sired over 50. Some <5. The average was around 22. There was a correlation of number of calves to sire age but I don't remember a correlation to SC.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 7:47 pm

knabe wrote:
at least browse jerry taylor's powerpoint slides.
I did...the one thing that caught my eye was "re-training"...care to expand on that; I did not blow up the pdf and read the find print...I will if it would help me breed better cattle...seems this was all about marbling improvement; no problem with that, just not my thing...
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knabe



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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:04 pm

re-training means as new markers are found, or old ones excluded, that data can be applied to the original training set, or if a founder marker is found from an individual not in the original training set, that can be added. there will always be false positives and false negatives within each training set for any trait. also, some markers may show to have more influence with more data and change the algorithm balance for markers. the above rationale is again why i made sure scott and his friends have semen as there is no way i could use it on the cow you are offering,which i would by the way, but the one's chosen i am entirely happy with. it could turn out to be a dead end, but the more original the animal, the less chance they would have had markers eliminated through whatever breeding process. in other words, if no other animal has them, it's hard to get them. it's not clear that all these effects will be simple snps as evidenced by the comment of the deletion in the bull mentioned in the slides from taylor. no one really knows yet just what % will come from snps, what % from insertions, deletions, or other rearrangements which include epigenetic effects which includes storing environmental effects as is known with mitochondria and now piwi rna. as far as i can tell, there isn't much large scale work with rna on traits of interest. the only reason old is good is if they have markers not found in recent populations which have the benefit of potentially more introgression of markers of interest compared to older bulls, which have a chance as well, but were diluted as you pointed out in another thread regarding the saved seed.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Thu Sep 08, 2011 6:43 am

knabe wrote:
re-training means as new markers are found, or old ones excluded, that data can be applied to the original training set, or if a founder marker is found from an individual not in the original training set, that can be added. there will always be false positives and false negatives within each training set for any trait. also, some markers may show to have more influence with more data and change the algorithm balance for markers. the above rationale is again why i made sure scott and his friends have semen as there is no way i could use it on the cow you are offering,which i would by the way, but the one's chosen i am entirely happy with. it could turn out to be a dead end, but the more original the animal, the less chance they would have had markers eliminated through whatever breeding process. in other words, if no other animal has them, it's hard to get them. it's not clear that all these effects will be simple snps as evidenced by the comment of the deletion in the bull mentioned in the slides from taylor. no one really knows yet just what % will come from snps, what % from insertions, deletions, or other rearrangements which include epigenetic effects which includes storing environmental effects as is known with mitochondria and now piwi rna. as far as i can tell, there isn't much large scale work with rna on traits of interest. the only reason old is good is if they have markers not found in recent populations which have the benefit of potentially more introgression of markers of interest compared to older bulls, which have a chance as well, but were diluted as you pointed out in another thread regarding the saved seed.
it`s all beyond me now; maybe beyond me forever...I would be curious what the "real" ibc`s are in a few cattle, but not curious enough to take the time or spend the money to satisfy my curiosity...but keep discussing it, and break it down more simply if it can be...
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PatB



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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Thu Sep 08, 2011 6:55 am

Keep watch of the dairy industry and their use of dna technology and figure that beef is at least 18 months behind. I recieved the Angus Journal yesterday with 2 sale catatlogs with it both had genomic profiles on most lots offered. The more reporting of genomic profiles the easier it should be to find markers for traits of interest.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Thu Sep 08, 2011 7:01 am

patb wrote:
Keep watch of the dairy industry and their use of dna technology and figure that beef is at least 18 months behind. I recieved the Angus Journal yesterday with 2 sale catatlogs with it both had genomic profiles on most lots offered. The more reporting of genomic profiles the easier it should be to find markers for traits of interest.
Given the difference in complexity of beef production and dairy, I`d suggest 18 years instead of 18 months ...
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PatB



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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Thu Sep 08, 2011 8:30 am

MKeeney wrote:
patb wrote:
Keep watch of the dairy industry and their use of dna technology and figure that beef is at least 18 months behind. I recieved the Angus Journal yesterday with 2 sale catatlogs with it both had genomic profiles on most lots offered. The more reporting of genomic profiles the easier it should be to find markers for traits of interest.
Given the difference in complexity of beef production and dairy, I`d suggest 18 years instead of 18 months ...

The technology will be implemented in dairy first then make its way to angus and then maybe other beef breeds.
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Mean Spirit



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PostSubject: Re: Applied Repro strategies   Thu Sep 08, 2011 9:37 am

What percentage of beef cattle are AI bred? My guess is well south of 20%. I'd venture that once beef folk adopt 1940s technology widely, they'll be more likely to adopt technology of the decades following that.

MS, already missing summer.
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