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 The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011

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larkota



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Location : Kimball South Dakota

PostSubject: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Thu Jun 16, 2011 10:22 pm

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PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Fri Jun 17, 2011 9:16 am

Yip, lots of empty fields, empty bins, empty pockets....maybe a few empty bellies to go along with it. I wonder how good DDG's make biscuit?
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Double B

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Join date : 2010-10-07
Age : 38
Location : Mt. Liberty Oh

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:40 am

I wonder how good DDG's make biscuit?

It makes pretty good dog biscuits. When I was buying it loose I got to playing with it to see if it would stay together in a 3/4 pellet (wetted about 50 lbs and pushed it thru a funnel and dried it next to the shop stove) I coudn't get enough pressure on it but they dried out and held together good. Anyway the dogs loved them since they had about run out of dried nut sacks.
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Angus 62



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PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 9:20 am

Sounds like Congress may have had enough of the ethanol charade.
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PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 9:54 am

Angus 62 wrote:
Sounds like Congress may have had enough of the ethanol charade.

Tell me more, tell me more.


Did they put up a fight.
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Hilly



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Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 10:20 am

From what I read they seem to consider this a small step... If it can gain some momentum and do an about face on this deal it would be a much needed reality check for most of us grain farmers. 
What is their plan for all the infrastructure if they back away?
 
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Angus 62



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PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 11:22 am

I believe the Senate passed a bill to repeal the blenders credit. One scenario is that ethanol will become more expensive than gas and the percentage mandate will be the next to go.

Scrap iron is still a decent price cheers

So with the smallest cow herd since WWII if corn gets a lot cheaper will you see expansion of the US cowherd?
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chocolate cow



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Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Kansas

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 2:44 pm

Isn't it doubtful that Obama will sign the repeal?
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Hilly



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Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 3:11 pm

Is there a cellulose source that they can harvest down there that is efficient enough to stand on its own to utilize the plants they have built?

Without funding the grain idea will be in free fall... up here I wonder about willow brush or other high moisture plants that grow on ground that typically cannot be used, but the logistics of harvest and transportation would most likely ground such ideas in a net negative position.

I have heard talk of the advantages of Switchgrass for this type of application but I have no experience with it...
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Double B

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PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 3:44 pm

Hilly wrote:
Is there a cellulose source that they can harvest down there that is efficient enough to stand on its own to utilize the plants they have built?

Without funding the grain idea will be in free fall... up here I wonder about willow brush or other high moisture plants that grow on ground that typically cannot be used, but the logistics of harvest and transportation would most likely ground such ideas in a net negative position.

I have heard talk of the advantages of Switchgrass for this type of application but I have no experience with it...

I don't much other than what I have read, but the long term effects of removeing all that from the soil seems like a bad idea to me.
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Tom D
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Age : 38
Location : Michigan

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 4:41 pm

Double B wrote:
Hilly wrote:
Is there a cellulose source that they can harvest down there that is efficient enough to stand on its own to utilize the plants they have built?

Without funding the grain idea will be in free fall... up here I wonder about willow brush or other high moisture plants that grow on ground that typically cannot be used, but the logistics of harvest and transportation would most likely ground such ideas in a net negative position.

I have heard talk of the advantages of Switchgrass for this type of application but I have no experience with it...

I don't much other than what I have read, but the long term effects of removeing all that from the soil seems like a bad idea to me.

Do we want to sequester carbon to help the atmosphere, or do we want to mine carbon to make fuel?
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Tom D
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PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 4:44 pm

Angus 62 wrote:

Scrap iron is still a decent price cheers

The paper mill near our U.P. ranch went broke and a Canadian company bought it just to scrap it out. They're dismantling the whole thing, shipping it out, and then pulling up the railroad tracks behind them.
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PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 6:07 pm

Tom D wrote:
Double B wrote:
Hilly wrote:
Is there a cellulose source that they can harvest down there that is efficient enough to stand on its own to utilize the plants they have built?

Without funding the grain idea will be in free fall... up here I wonder about willow brush or other high moisture plants that grow on ground that typically cannot be used, but the logistics of harvest and transportation would most likely ground such ideas in a net negative position.

I have heard talk of the advantages of Switchgrass for this type of application but I have no experience with it...

I don't much other than what I have read, but the long term effects of removeing all that from the soil seems like a bad idea to me.

Do we want to sequester carbon to help the atmosphere, or do we want to mine carbon to make fuel?

Neither
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Angus 62



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Join date : 2010-09-26

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sat Jun 18, 2011 7:02 pm

I don't see switch grass or any biomass produced ethanol being realistic unless it hugely subsidized or on a small scale where large amounts of residue are available - logging for instance.

Corn is bad enough but taking huge amounts of organic matter off of land is a dead end sooner than later.
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Grassfarmer



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Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sun Jun 19, 2011 12:42 am

Hilly wrote:
Is there a cellulose source that they can harvest down there that is efficient enough to stand on its own to utilize the plants they have built?

Without funding the grain idea will be in free fall... up here I wonder about willow brush or other high moisture plants that grow on ground that typically cannot be used, but the logistics of harvest and transportation would most likely ground such ideas in a net negative position.

I have heard talk of the advantages of Switchgrass for this type of application but I have no experience with it...

I think the willow coppicing idea is actually realistic - they have several plants in Europe that have been in production for a while now and have the practical side worked out - round balers that cut and bale the crop, planting machines etc. They are doing it on an experimental basis now based out of Drayton Valley, AB using the European experience. Drayton Valley sees biofuel as its post petroleum future and have a number of projects on the go under their "Biomile" initiative.
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Hilly



Posts : 388
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : Sylvan Lake, Alberta

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sun Jun 19, 2011 1:10 am

Grassfarmer wrote:
Hilly wrote:
Is there a cellulose source that they can harvest down there that is efficient enough to stand on its own to utilize the plants they have built?

Without funding the grain idea will be in free fall... up here I wonder about willow brush or other high moisture plants that grow on ground that typically cannot be used, but the logistics of harvest and transportation would most likely ground such ideas in a net negative position.

I have heard talk of the advantages of Switchgrass for this type of application but I have no experience with it...

I think the willow coppicing idea is actually realistic - they have several plants in Europe that have been in production for a while now and have the practical side worked out - round balers that cut and bale the crop, planting machines etc. They are doing it on an experimental basis now based out of Drayton Valley, AB using the European experience. Drayton Valley sees biofuel as its post petroleum future and have a number of projects on the go under their "Biomile" initiative.

Interesting, I had not heard of that project... In a quick once over I didn’t see an estimate on the % efficacy, but from the little I know it should come in well above the grain idea, mined you that’s not setting the bar very high Smile
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Oldtimer

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Join date : 2010-10-04
Location : Northeast Montana

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sun Jun 26, 2011 3:23 pm

Lot of wheat fields in this area will be unseeded this year- or seeded to alternative later season crops like oats, millet, or sudan grass...Just been too wet to seed...Hay will be at a premium also with all the hayland on the Milk and Missouri that is still under water...

I moved to the north ranch June 6th- and haven't been able to get back home since....I just checked and the water is dropping off our road- but there isn't much road there left...Maybe if it doesn't rain (big IF) and the road gets dry enough the county can get it patched enough I can get home this week sometime... Wife has spent over 2 months in town now and is anxious to get home (even tho the neighbors bulls they turned loose in the flooding halfway wrecked her yard and flowers)...

But one thing we do have is grass...Belly deep in the creek bottoms and drainage areas...If and when I get back to my home computer I'll try and stick on some pictures....
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PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sun Jun 26, 2011 3:44 pm

Glad you still have weather to watch, Oldtimer, I been afraid to go outside for a month without your weather report Very Happy

Welcome back to the land of the living.
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Tom D
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Age : 38
Location : Michigan

PostSubject: Re: The Great Missouri River Flood of 2011   Sun Jun 26, 2011 7:11 pm

We've had Bootheel watching the river to make sure your carcass didn't float past, now he can get back to work. What a relief. Smile
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