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 Pinkeye and other summer ills

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RobertMac



Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-09-28
Location : Mississippi, USA

PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Wed Jul 01, 2015 9:52 am

Both
Bulls and embryos from Laurie(Isa)...L-5502 bull genetics
3n1s from Dale(Foundation herd)
Casey Beefmasters is another you should look at. Dr. Watt Casey is Mr. Tom's brother-in-law. I think he is 95 this year...wonderful man.
Genetics in those programs are out of the Foundation herd Tom Lasater closed in 1938(?).
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Kent Powell



Posts : 500
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Location : SW Kansas

PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Wed Jul 01, 2015 11:53 am

Being right today is a lot like being the only sober one in the car and no one will let you drive!


MKeeney wrote:
Kent Powell wrote:
http://www.isacattleco.com/Beefmasters/company.html

is there any greater prize than just being right? Smile Robert, your base came from Dale ???
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Kent Powell



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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Wed Jul 01, 2015 12:43 pm

"Intense selection for economically important traits over the last 70 plus years has resulted in a homozygous beef breed that has locked in the explosive growth potential of a hybrid."

?
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Wed Jul 01, 2015 1:05 pm

Kent Powell wrote:
Being right today is a lot like being the only sober one in the car and no one will let you drive!


MKeeney wrote:
Kent Powell wrote:
http://www.isacattleco.com/Beefmasters/company.html

is there any greater prize than just being right? Smile Robert, your base came from Dale ???

yesterday as well...Thoreau stated that majority rule came about because the majority could whip the minority fight/battle etc...and then asked "when will we ever respect a wise minority?

I believe we can answer "not yet"
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Wed Jul 01, 2015 4:46 pm

RobertMac wrote:
Both
Bulls and embryos from Laurie(Isa)...L-5502 bull genetics
3n1s from Dale(Foundation herd)
Casey Beefmasters is another you should look at. Dr. Watt Casey is Mr. Tom's brother-in-law. I think he is 95 this year...wonderful man.
Genetics in those programs are out of the Foundation herd Tom Lasater closed in 1938(?).

nice slideshow here;;;despite some poor links... Cool

http://ambergrassfedbeef.com/grassfed/grassfedbeef.html#about
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Wed Jul 01, 2015 7:47 pm

Kent Powell wrote:
"Intense selection for economically important traits over the last 70 plus years has resulted in a homozygous beef breed that has locked in the explosive growth potential of a hybrid."

?

scratchscratch expressed in the hybirds, I accept... explosive growth locked in to the parent stock I have a problem with...I would just want f1 cows with more pest resistance and function than straight bred Angus...guess I`m wanting the wrong things...and maybe looking in the wrong places scratch
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: why????   Fri Jul 03, 2015 7:20 am

why
6.Use entire contents of vial when first opened.

Question Question
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RobertMac



Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-09-28
Location : Mississippi, USA

PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Fri Jul 03, 2015 9:11 am

Mike, Looking in the evil and misleading SGF, I see where Larry Sansom is doing some cross breeding of interest.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Fri Jul 03, 2015 2:13 pm

RobertMac wrote:
Mike, Looking in the evil and misleading SGF, I see where Larry Sansom is doing some cross breeding of interest.

gesshhhh, I thought the Fabron Angus were perfect in every way... Shocked Shocked
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Sun Jul 05, 2015 7:55 am

Show Me genes feed results...

Results from Steer Feedout Finale Show Losses and Lessons
Missouri Ag Connection - 07/02/2015

The Missouri Steer Feedout Finale held last week in Mt. Vernon revealed the results of the 158 head of steers from 2014 that went to Iowa last November. The cattle were owned by 20 different cattlemen from across the state.

Last November feeder cattle prices were near or at record highs with these six weight steers valued at $1515 per head at the start of the finishing phase.

"Consignors knew then several things had to go their way to prevent significant losses in the feedlot," said Eldon Cole, livestock specialist with University of Missouri Extension. "Well, not everything went the way you'd like."

The feeding period showed a loss of $194.40 per head. Cole said this was similar to other closeouts in the last couple of months. In fact in 2012 and 2013 comparable losses were made in the Missouri Feedouts. Things improved in 2014 with black ink replacing the red.

"The closeout data reveals that of the 20 different groups of steers, only one owner avoided a loss," said Cole.

A longtime participant in the feedout, Kunkel Farms, Neosho posted a per head profit of $60.69. The balance of the feedout entries ranged from a loss of only $18.50 per head for Lakeview Farms, Joplin to a whopping loss of $403.94 per head. The latter entry lost one steer and had heavy treatment charges.

During his presentation, Darrell Busby, manager of the Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity said this turned out to be one of the worst winters to feed cattle in southwest Iowa.

"We battled respiratory problems in several of the TCSCF lots. This impacted performance, vet costs, lung adhesions noted when hung on the rail, and, of course, death loss. Actual costs of gain were greater than anticipated by $15.13 per hundred," said Busby.

Of the 158 steers sent to Iowa, six died. Three were sold as feeders or realizers.

There were 149 that completed the program on schedule and from which carcass data was obtained. The performance of those 149 was fairly good except for rate of gain which at 3.22 pounds per day was below the TCSCF previous year's average of 3.50 pounds.

"The Missouri steers feed conversion was 6.49 pounds per pound of gain. This was a slight bit better than the year previous of 6.70," said Cole.

From a carcass perspective the steers had 77 percent low Choice or better and 61 percent were yield grades 1's and 2's. The quality grade percentage was better than seen in nine of the last ten feedouts.

Only 8 percent of the black-hided steers were Certified Angus Beef. The national average for CAB is 24 percent. One Missouri steer did grade Prime minus. He was entered by Norman Garton, Nevada. That grade boosted the steer's carcass value by $19 per hundred over the base. A herd mate came close to that value with a Choice plus grade. The total value of his 947-pound carcass topped the 149 head at $2509.64.

The Kunkel steers were sired by Red Angus bulls and were out of high percentage Red Angus dams. All five of the steers graded low Choice. Four were yield grades 2 and the other one a 3.

"They were fortunate to have stayed healthy, except for one steer's $25 health charge," said Cole.

They achieved the 70 percent - 70 percent - 0 percent goal with a 100-80-0 rating. Oher groups who attained that target included: Jay Kerr, Mexico, Leon James, Hurdland, Russell Marion, Pierce City and Larry Busby, Parnell. The latter group did lose one of their six steers, but the remaining 5 ended up with a 100-100-0 score.

Individually, two steers stood out. An Angus-sired steer from Charles Rosenkrans, Paris was the top-ranking steer for his retail value per day of age score of $5.39.

Russell Marion's, Pierce City number 379 claimed the top retail value per day on feed at $7.84. He was Angus-sired.

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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Tue Jul 07, 2015 7:08 am

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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Sat Jul 11, 2015 1:41 am

MKeeney wrote:
Show Me genes feed results...

Results from Steer Feedout Finale Show Losses and Lessons
Missouri Ag Connection - 07/02/2015

The Missouri Steer Feedout Finale held last week in Mt. Vernon revealed the results of the 158 head of steers from 2014 that went to Iowa last November. The cattle were owned by 20 different cattlemen from across the state.

Last November feeder cattle prices were near or at record highs with these six weight steers valued at $1515 per head at the start of the finishing phase.

"Consignors knew then several things had to go their way to prevent significant losses in the feedlot," said Eldon Cole, livestock specialist with University of Missouri Extension. "Well, not everything went the way you'd like."

The feeding period showed a loss of $194.40 per head. Cole said this was similar to other closeouts in the last couple of months. In fact in 2012 and 2013 comparable losses were made in the Missouri Feedouts. Things improved in 2014 with black ink replacing the red.

"The closeout data reveals that of the 20 different groups of steers, only one owner avoided a loss," said Cole.

A longtime participant in the feedout, Kunkel Farms, Neosho posted a per head profit of $60.69. The balance of the feedout entries ranged from a loss of only $18.50 per head for Lakeview Farms, Joplin to a whopping loss of $403.94 per head. The latter entry lost one steer and had heavy treatment charges.

During his presentation, Darrell Busby, manager of the Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity said this turned out to be one of the worst winters to feed cattle in southwest Iowa.

"We battled respiratory problems in several of the TCSCF lots. This impacted performance, vet costs, lung adhesions noted when hung on the rail, and, of course, death loss. Actual costs of gain were greater than anticipated by $15.13 per hundred," said Busby.

Of the 158 steers sent to Iowa, six died. Three were sold as feeders or realizers.

There were 149 that completed the program on schedule and from which carcass data was obtained. The performance of those 149 was fairly good except for rate of gain which at 3.22 pounds per day was below the TCSCF previous year's average of 3.50 pounds.

"The Missouri steers feed conversion was 6.49 pounds per pound of gain. This was a slight bit better than the year previous of 6.70," said Cole.

From a carcass perspective the steers had 77 percent low Choice or better and 61 percent were yield grades 1's and 2's. The quality grade percentage was better than seen in nine of the last ten feedouts.

Only 8 percent of the black-hided steers were Certified Angus Beef. The national average for CAB is 24 percent. One Missouri steer did grade Prime minus. He was entered by Norman Garton, Nevada. That grade boosted the steer's carcass value by $19 per hundred over the base. A herd mate came close to that value with a Choice plus grade. The total value of his 947-pound carcass topped the 149 head at $2509.64.

The Kunkel steers were sired by Red Angus bulls and were out of high percentage Red Angus dams. All five of the steers graded low Choice. Four were yield grades 2 and the other one a 3.

"They were fortunate to have stayed healthy, except for one steer's $25 health charge," said Cole.

They achieved the 70 percent - 70 percent - 0 percent goal with a 100-80-0 rating. Oher groups who attained that target included: Jay Kerr, Mexico, Leon James, Hurdland, Russell Marion, Pierce City and Larry Busby, Parnell. The latter group did lose one of their six steers, but the remaining 5 ended up with a 100-100-0 score.

Individually, two steers stood out. An Angus-sired steer from Charles Rosenkrans, Paris was the top-ranking steer for his retail value per day of age score of $5.39.

Russell Marion's, Pierce City number 379 claimed the top retail value per day on feed at $7.84. He was Angus-sired.


how do we get to 100-200 $B bulls when here in the land of the syden cowruiners steers are losing $190/ hd ? 8% black hided steers making CAB...retract my statement about Wulf Limmy-Jersey crosses; things are looking up...
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Sat Jul 11, 2015 1:51 am

the one thing I have learned about pinkeye that I should have known is that using IBR modified live vaccine creates a temporary? susceptibility in the eye for pinkeye...I`ve vaccinated plenty of brought in steers that would get bad eyes within 10 days or so...called it IBR reaction when it was likely pinkeye...
the long range vaccinated/fly tagged/no seed heads pasture calves here that broke with pinkeye were IBR modified live vaccinated the same day...just hypothesizing...
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EddieM



Posts : 648
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Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Sat Jul 11, 2015 9:14 am

MKeeney wrote:
the one thing I have learned about pinkeye that I should have known is that using IBR modified live vaccine creates a temporary? susceptibility in the eye for pinkeye...I`ve vaccinated plenty of brought in steers that would get bad eyes within 10 days or so...called it IBR reaction when it was likely pinkeye...
 the long range vaccinated/fly tagged/no seed heads pasture calves here that broke with pinkeye were IBR modified live vaccinated the same day...just hypothesizing...
Have you tried intranasal vaccines? I hear they smell like peppermint. jocolor
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Sat Jul 11, 2015 11:48 am

EddieM wrote:
MKeeney wrote:
the one thing I have learned about pinkeye that I should have known is that using IBR modified live vaccine creates a temporary? susceptibility in the eye for pinkeye...I`ve vaccinated plenty of brought in steers that would get bad eyes within 10 days or so...called it IBR reaction when it was likely pinkeye...
 the long range vaccinated/fly tagged/no seed heads pasture calves here that broke with pinkeye were IBR modified live vaccinated the same day...just hypothesizing...
Have you tried intranasal vaccines?  I hear they smell like peppermint. jocolor

years ago...no clue to effectiveness or repercussions
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Sun Jul 12, 2015 12:51 pm

can genetics provide a cheaper immunity ?



well, we`ll see...
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Thu Jul 16, 2015 9:33 pm

MKeeney wrote:
can genetics provide a cheaper immunity ?



well, we`ll see...


PCC NEWSLETTER
Bred-in parasite resistance is one of many areas in which Pharo Cattle Company has assumed the leadership position. We want to continue to be “Different for all the Right Reasons.” We evaluated and scored hair coat for many years. We have been evaluating and scoring the bulls we sell for fly resistance since 2007. As Steelman suggested, there seems to be a relatively high correlation between hair coat score and fly resistance score.

Research has shown that horn flies can reduce daily gains by as much as ½ pound per day. That could amount to 50 to 100 pounds per calf at weaning. Do the math! At just $2.00 per pound, what’s a bull worth that can genetically improve the fly resistance of your herd?

I don’t know of any other seedstock producers who evaluate and score their cattle for genetic fly resistance. Smaller framed animals have significantly fewer flies than larger framed animals within the same breed. Cattle of the same breed seem to be born with approximately the same numbers of hairs. When you enlarge the frame size, you have fewer hairs per square inch. The bigger the animal, the greater the distance between hairs.



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EddieM



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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Fri Jul 17, 2015 8:04 am

Looks like the flies won.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Fri Jul 17, 2015 8:39 am

EddieM wrote:
Looks like the flies won.

and the worms...wonder what the ones that got culled looked like ?
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EddieM



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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Fri Jul 17, 2015 9:14 am

farao
Quote :
Smaller framed animals have significantly fewer flies than larger framed animals within the same breed.

Don't know as I do not travel a lot of places and speak far enough away from home to know much. I know that I am backwards but I generally want the cows to be taller than the sheep.
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Fri Jul 17, 2015 11:36 am

The greater mystery is from where does the audacity come to make such claims...dna or environment?...measuring and selecting for more traits than anyone in the industry of course means you are making less progress than anyone in the industry on any one trait...progress is slowed by the square root of the number of traits selected for...I call it Gavin`s law...
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EddieM



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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Fri Jul 17, 2015 1:35 pm

Quote :
The only difference between a 3-frame cow and a 5-frame cow is four inches between the ground and the belly – which doesn’t weigh very much and is impossible to eat.


This is a dumb statement when the short frame calves will sell for so much less. Size is not the only difference.

Quote :
The hottest topic within the beef industry right now is fly control. When confronted with a problem, most producers are quick to spend an inordinate amount of time, energy and money treating the symptoms – while they totally ignore the problem. Folks, if we never work at solving the problem, we will never get rid of the problem – and it will continue to get worse.

I did not know that fly control was "hot". I spent about 30 seconds per cow the other month with some cheap pour-on and the flies are still gone. I guess I am a herd quitter of a different color. I spent no time marking on a paper which cow had the most or the least flies. So I saved more time with pour on than I lost counting and marking. And the taller calves will be worth more to boot.

Quote :
Research has shown that horn flies can reduce daily gains by as much as ½ pound per day. That could amount to 50 to 100 pounds per calf at weaning. Do the math! At just $2.00 per pound, what’s a bull worth that can genetically improve the fly resistance of your herd?

Why do math here and avoid math on the frame score discussion? I can use fly control, gain the weight and still earn more per pound because more buyers want the FS5+/- calves for more dollars than the FS3's.

Quote :
I don’t know of any other seedstock producers who evaluate and score their cattle for genetic fly resistance. Most (if not all) use chemical insecticides to cover up inferior genetics. How is that going to help anyone? The end result of using chemical insecticides is the creation of superior flies – and inferior cows. Chemical insecticides are also responsible for killing a multitude of good bugs and organisms. Dung beetles, for example, are nearly extinct on most farms and ranches.

Might want to review the old quotes. One about if you are riding in front of the herd look back every once in a while to see if they are still following. If you know of no one else doing what you are doing with old data then you ought to ask yourself why are you doing it?

I have not see any superior flies but then again I do not believe in evolution. Some flies do build resistance. Chemical insecticides have wiped out malaria and a lot of bad things. So let's not lump all things by broad generalizations.

I'd like to see the data about the extinct dung beetles. Probably read that from a wormer product brochure that promotes a chemical insecticide. But I doubt the extinction story. We have plenty of the beetles.

Quote :
Quote Worth Re-Quoting –

“Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” ~ Winston Churchill

When you put up quotes it is recommended to read both the first part and the second part.
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RobertMac



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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Sun Jul 19, 2015 9:32 pm

MKeeney wrote:
can genetics provide a cheaper immunity ?



well, we`ll see...

You going to buy the bull or do you just like the picture? Laughing
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Mon Jul 20, 2015 7:56 am

instead of cactus, he is now expected to eat thistles and fescue....bought him some girlfriends as well; if it doesn`t pan out, it`s your fault Robert Very Happy

just kidding; the bull matches the picture in flesh ; that`s all I ask...Flores Beefmasters is the new REGISTRED entity...one of these days, one of these wild goose chases might find at least a duck...this one makes the most sense of complimenting what exist here for the maternal objective...
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PostSubject: Re: Pinkeye and other summer ills   Fri Jul 31, 2015 8:26 am

the next research will be with these folks who seem very well versed and their product is reasonably priced ...Hendley`s first post on this thread indicated no success with autogenous  vaccine...gotta see for myself...

http://addisonlabs.com/products/M.Bovoculi.php
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