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 Amos Cruickshanks comments

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Grassfarmer



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PostSubject: Amos Cruickshanks comments   Mon Feb 07, 2011 9:34 pm

I happened to come across a website with some comments by Amos Cruickshanks about the sires he had used and bred over the years in the Shorthorn breed. I like the honesty of the comments, something that can maybe only come with age and reflection - he was 85 years old at the time.

Here is a link to the webpage and the comments are at the bottom of the page on a narrow white strip.
http://www.puregrassbeef.com/cruickshank_scotch_shorthorn

Here are a few of the comments;

Ivanhoe (14735) Red, calved 1855 "Won many prizes in England; did no good"

Scotch Rose (25099), red, calved 1866. "Great prize winner:did no good. Scotch Rose was the winner of fifteen prizes and many challenge cups, two being of the value of 100 guineas each"

Report (10704), roan, calved 1809 "Everything got by him was good, made a mistake in parting with him. He was not much to look at."

Pride of the Isles (35072), roan, calved 1872 "Valuable sire, sold as a calf and bought back"

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PostSubject: Re: Amos Cruickshanks comments   Mon Feb 07, 2011 9:51 pm

Good stuff Grassfarmer, Canadian winters....good for producing crops of wisdom
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Amos Cruickshanks comments   Tue Feb 08, 2011 7:31 am

great stuff...a winter`s worth of reading it appears...it seems farmers knew what they were doing before the land grant colleges evolved Smile

"It was about this time that the Aberdeen-Angus cattle improved so much, and there can be no doubt that many a dash of Short-horn blood was introduced with much advantage to the black-skins. This, however, is away from the point. The great scarcity of Aberdeen-Angus heifers drove the farmers to use the Aberdeen-Angus bulls on their cross-bred Short-horn grade cows. I can distinctly remember the subject of the doings of a farmer, an owner of a herd of highgrade (Short-horn) cows, being discussed widely with much head-shaking,seeing he had ventured to use a polled bull in his herd. His experiment was carefully watched, and before five years there was-a demand for Aberdeen-Angus bulls for use in farmers' herds of cross-bred (in fact, Short-horn) grade cows.

"For the past thiry years the following may be said to be the common practice in the north of Scotland. As I have said, the cows in the hands of farmers were more or less Short-horns. These were put to the Aberdeen-Angus bulls, and the heifers kept as cows practically first crosses. TheEe and their daughters were again put to Aberdeen-Angus bulls, when Short-horn bulls were again brought in for several generations, and so on, alternating between Short-horns and Aberdeen-Angus sires (always pure-bred herd-book animals), the farmers possessing herds of cows the direct female descendants of cows owned by their grandfathers.

"I do not know as I need say anything more on this subject. The blend of the two breeds is a mixture which produces a class of cattle having no equal as a rent-paying stock in this country; and speaking from my own observation, I believe it matters little how the mixture is concocted so long as it is Short-horn and Aberdeen-Angus, the judgment of the breeder being brought into play in determining the amount of either of the two factors. It must, however, be borne in mind that even this valuable mixture could not produce the prime Scots which the London west-end butchers sell at such high prices, and which the "upper ten" are pleased to pay for, if the north country farmers ever allowed their young stock to lose their calf flesh. To produce the high-selling article, an ox ought to be fit to kill any time during his life, and the question of the proper age for slaughter entirely depends upon markets and such-like circumstances. Many people unacquainted with the northern cattle say the first cross is the only right one, but you may go from farm to farm in the north of Scotland, where, as I have said, nothing but cross-bred cows have been bred in the family for generations, and yet the farmers pride themselves on their herds of cows— cows that produce steers to top the London market."

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PostSubject: Re: Amos Cruickshanks comments   Tue Feb 08, 2011 8:02 am

MKeeney wrote:
great stuff...a winter`s worth of reading it appears...it seems farmers knew what they were doing before the land grant colleges evolved Smile

"It was about this time that the Aberdeen-Angus cattle improved so much, and there can be no doubt that many a dash of Short-horn blood was introduced with much advantage to the black-skins. This, however, is away from the point. The great scarcity of Aberdeen-Angus heifers drove the farmers to use the Aberdeen-Angus bulls on their cross-bred Short-horn grade cows. I can distinctly remember the subject of the doings of a farmer, an owner of a herd of highgrade (Short-horn) cows, being discussed widely with much head-shaking,seeing he had ventured to use a polled bull in his herd. His experiment was carefully watched, and before five years there was-a demand for Aberdeen-Angus bulls for use in farmers' herds of cross-bred (in fact, Short-horn) grade cows.

"For the past thiry years the following may be said to be the common practice in the north of Scotland. As I have said, the cows in the hands of farmers were more or less Short-horns. These were put to the Aberdeen-Angus bulls, and the heifers kept as cows practically first crosses. TheEe and their daughters were again put to Aberdeen-Angus bulls, when Short-horn bulls were again brought in for several generations, and so on, alternating between Short-horns and Aberdeen-Angus sires (always pure-bred herd-book animals), the farmers possessing herds of cows the direct female descendants of cows owned by their grandfathers.

"I do not know as I need say anything more on this subject. The blend of the two breeds is a mixture which produces a class of cattle having no equal as a rent-paying stock in this country; and speaking from my own observation, I believe it matters little how the mixture is concocted so long as it is Short-horn and Aberdeen-Angus, the judgment of the breeder being brought into play in determining the amount of either of the two factors. It must, however, be borne in mind that even this valuable mixture could not produce the prime Scots which the London west-end butchers sell at such high prices, and which the "upper ten" are pleased to pay for, if the north country farmers ever allowed their young stock to lose their calf flesh. To produce the high-selling article, an ox ought to be fit to kill any time during his life, and the question of the proper age for slaughter entirely depends upon markets and such-like circumstances. Many people unacquainted with the northern cattle say the first cross is the only right one, but you may go from farm to farm in the north of Scotland, where, as I have said, nothing but cross-bred cows have been bred in the family for generations, and yet the farmers pride themselves on their herds of cows— cows that produce steers to top the London market."


A two-breed rotation.......... Crying or Very sad using crossbred cows! That is just crazy talk! Crying or Very sad
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PostSubject: Re: Amos Cruickshanks comments   Tue Feb 08, 2011 10:05 am

MKeeney wrote:
great stuff...a winter`s worth of reading it appears...it seems farmers knew what they were doing before the land grant colleges evolved Smile

Isn't that the truth will most of agriculture today though? we have undergone such a dumbing down of the old knowledge through the land grant colleges and chemical and drug corporations with their sales campaigns disguised as research. Farmers using GM technology and Roundup and ranchers breeding bulls by the EPD numbers and being constantly told they are so far ahead scientifically they don't realise how far behind they really are Rolling Eyes
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