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PostSubject: Angusology   Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:25 pm

I've been sittin' in on this here "Reflections" course by Dr. Leonhardt. As a simple, average kinda guy I thought this class would be just the ticket but became quickly disillusioned after the first lecture. I was there right up through "The simple short answer is to improve the desired consistency of the complimentary cross OVER AND OVER AGAIN !!!!. " but then got lost after all the born again testimonials, funny pictures, graphs, pedigree's and whatnot. Felt like kickin' a dead horse. It appears that only a handful of Einstein's will ever truly attain an average herd of cows. And since I've never read Bakewell, studied Mendel, or met Lingle (but to my credit, I have read some L'Amour), I decided to pack it in. Just last week I held my complete, total, and final dispersion of my sorry above average cows and am off on a new cattle venture. I'll leave it to all you Mensa types to work through the Angus mess. My apologies to my small band of loyal customers for leaving them high, dry, and lonesome but tough noogies. Adios.


Whitney Creek King Tut and Whitney Creek Aphrodite. My new foundation stock.


King Tut showing off. I have it on good authority that I can get ten grand a pop for these rascals. I understand there are plenty of wealthy gentlemen that will pay handsomely to sit in the back of my pick-up with a ranch issue Lazy Boy and fifty caliber Hawken.

Later boys. Wish me luck.


Last edited by Taylor Orr on Tue Feb 01, 2011 11:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:56 pm

Taylor if the snow keeps coming down up here I may need some of those cattle- paint their horns orange-- and at least have something sticking out above the snow banks... Wink

Not much warmup yet- minus 28 already tonight...
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Wed Feb 02, 2011 2:04 pm

OT, I'm glad you think my new cattle might work in your country. Your area has certainly been in the news, especially regarding the wildlife crisis. We've had some cold and snow but nothing compared to you and other parts of the country.

If truth be told, it was a neighbor that influenced my switch to the big horned cattle. He has had a few Watusi around for years as mascots, and for the wow factor. His advice is to leave them the hell alone and run them like native antelope. So, I'll be selling my tub, alley, and chute, and everything else I can think of relating to intensive cattle management. All I need is a big loop.

I'll also be selling all my Wye, Shoshone, and Premier Independence semen. I'm sure you'll agree that the Independence bull is the best maternal Angus bull to ever walk the planet, bar none. I fully expect his semen to top the Shoshone Felix deal from last year. The owners of Independence have assured me they will honor the current certificate price, so that's a comfort. More later..........
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Wed Feb 02, 2011 3:21 pm

Yep--Taylor the antelope are dying off by the thousands...They are getting up on the highways and train tracks as the only open ground they can find and getting slaughtered there... I think last week alone they said the trains locally had hit nearly 400 of them- something like 270 in one bunch...
If the deer weren't in someones haystack when the big snows hit- I'm sure they aren't making it either...I haven't seen one in weeks...
Eagles are really raising cain with the pheasants and grouse coming out into the feedgrounds looking for something to eat....

I have a feeling when this snow starts melting and all the deer/antelope carcass's start showing up- there will be dozens of eagles feasting in the valley...

Only question I have on your "new bloodlines" is what is their EN$ EPD? Seems like they would burn up a lot of feed just packing those antlers around.... Wink

-40 again this morning--but now at 1:30 it has warmed up to -5, sunshine and no wind...Cows are loving it... Very Happy
But they are predicting another weekly weekend snow storm- and temps back down frigidly the same by Sunday... Crying or Very sad
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Sun Feb 20, 2011 12:50 pm

Taylor Orr, Why not bring your horns over to the LH thread and join forces w/us. I wonder if spring has sprung here in the "banana Belt" OT might be in the middle of more winter, A?
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Sun Feb 20, 2011 2:19 pm

Dennis Voss wrote:
Taylor Orr, Why not bring your horns over to the LH thread and join forces w/us. I wonder if spring has sprung here in the "banana Belt" OT might be in the middle of more winter, A?

Weather guessers missed this one...They said all the snow was going to stay south of the Missouri- and I'm 30 miles north of the Lake and we had about 4 inches overnight- and now predicting possibly another 4 Shocked

I heard areas down by Miles City had a foot....

Damn I'm getting tired of winter....
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Sun Feb 20, 2011 6:03 pm

Dennis, Thanks for the invite. When I get King Tut broke to ride I'll trot on over. I'm a little preoccupied with calving in this banana belt weather we are enjoying. May be spring before I get Tut in the round pen.

OT, The family is gettin' a little owly about the sorry weather hereabouts, with no end in sight. What tips can you offer for curing cabin fever, other than mind numbing medicinal's or moving?
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Mon Feb 21, 2011 1:21 pm

[quote=

gettin' a little owly about the sorry weather hereabouts, with no end in sight. What tips can you offer for curing cabin fever, other than mind numbing medicinal's or moving?



Your wife must have a day job out of the home??? Idea
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Mon Feb 21, 2011 6:59 pm

Taylor Orr wrote:


OT, The family is gettin' a little owly about the sorry weather hereabouts, with no end in sight. What tips can you offer for curing cabin fever, other than mind numbing medicinal's or moving?

Owly is putting it mildly for our case....More just plain @^#$$&^ GRUMPY.... My wife made me close the door to my office when I check the weather report on the computer after the 2 year old Granddaughter started talking about the "d#mn snow" the other day...

I don't even know if liquid medicinals will work anymore... We ended up with 8" of new snow- and the few bare hilltops we had are all gone again...Weather folks are predicting another snowstorm starting tommorrow night- and then into the really frigid deepfreeze (20-30 Below) later in the week....
And the long term forecast shows no change in the pattern- or sign of a major warmup....

And each snowstorm brings us closer to having all the roads in or out of this valley closed in a flood... Weather bureau says we now have 19" on the level-- but have received over 92" since October...
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Mon Feb 21, 2011 7:38 pm

Oldtimer should try and find some yak semen.

Yaks, native to the Himalayan mountains of Tibet, Nepal, and the surrounding areas, were first domesticated over 3000 years ago (a long, long, time ago, frankincense and myrrh were big in those days). Truly the economic engine of the indigenous, nomadic peoples, yaks provide wool, hides, milk, butter, meat and transportation. Yaks rely on their sure-footedness and agility to carry salt and grain through the other-worldly terrain of the Himalayas. Maybe it was a Yak that "jumped over the moon". Even their dung is collected to heat gers (yurts) and other shelters. Yaks have big horns (Really-BIG-Horns), a low slung body, a buffalo like shoulder hump, a tail like a horse, and long hairy kilts (the naks wear skirts). Yaks look both familiar and exotic at the same time. With thick undercoats to insulate them from the cold they are superbly adapted for high altitudes and cold climates.

Yaks (bos grunniens) are members of the Bovidea family and are cousins of domestic cattle (bos tarus/bos indicus) and bison (bison bison). They do cross -kissin' cousins- readily with bison and cattle. The first generation males are sterile and the females fertile. As ruminants (four chambered stomachs), they are highly efficient grazing on grasses and forbs.

Yak heifers can be bred as early as 18 months, and gestation is 258 days (8.5 months). Yak bulls are dependable for breeding at age three. Calving is usually real fast! Hardy yak calves grow quickly on the cow’s rich milk. Wild yaks usually calve every other year but domestic yaks, with access to plentiful pasture, reproduce every year, and occasionally have twins.



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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Mon Feb 21, 2011 8:15 pm

It looks like someone beat us to it!
If the old theory that the buffalo looking/type bulls are more maternal- then these Yaks should be maternal...

http://www.theyakranch.com/yak-photos/Yak-bull-pen/Yak-Bull-sir-wintson.html

Quote :

Yak meat, deep red with little fat, is very tender. The flavor of yak meat is best described as beef-like but different; we think better. It is high in protein and low in fat. Yak meat is an ideal choice for folks interested in the paleo diet, caveman, or hunter gatherer diets. The benefits of grassfed beef, bison, and wild game are becoming more and more apparent as research continues. Grassfed yak meat is a nutrient dense food. With near daily bad news about conventionally raised and processed beef, e.coli infection, and recalls, we think it is time to do something about it. Take the benefits of organic, grassfed, beef to the next level -




Switch to Yak - You Won't Switch Back


Last edited by Oldtimer on Mon Feb 21, 2011 8:21 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Mon Feb 21, 2011 8:16 pm

I've got the contacts OT Laughing - one of the biggest yak breeders in N America is about 7 miles from me.
http://shanepatti.tripod.com/id30.htm
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Mon Feb 21, 2011 9:56 pm

Grassfarmer wrote:
I've got the contacts OT Laughing - one of the biggest yak breeders in N America is about 7 miles from me.
http://shanepatti.tripod.com/id30.htm

Small world...That is my sister in-laws brother. I looked after their place for a year, back 12 or so years ago when they ran Fullblood Simmentals and only a few Yaks. One thing about the Yaks they keep the herd bulls on best behavior as they can be a bit testy...disembowelled one of my mares and took exception to my Anatolian Shepherd, all in all they were quiet enough they just preferred to be left alone.

I hear first hand of all the advantages Wink
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PostSubject: Re: Angusology   Tue Feb 22, 2011 2:17 am



I wanna see Mongo ride this guy.
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