Keeney`s Corner

A current and reflective discussion of cattle breeding from outside the registered mainstream
 
HomeUsergroupsRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 Competition for land uses

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Competition for land uses   Fri Mar 14, 2014 10:35 pm

How does an individual buy a nicely contoured productive farm in NZ - you can see why the current focus of the "experts" is on finding "hill country genetics" - funny thing is that several Angus breeders in NZ have only been focussing on that philosophy after ignoring the same "experts" for the last 15 years - others that have tried to breed Scottish / Japanese / Exotic type Angus 'cos the computer said may have a bit of a problem as the cows are literally pushed into the mountains as dairying gobbles up anything else that anyone can just about drive a tractor over.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/business/9830969/Dairy-farm-sells-for-over-64m

Pretty sure that the above land sale will make most valuer's and real estate agents who have given anything resembling a market price quotation to a land owner in the last week look a little silly
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Sun Mar 16, 2014 7:27 am

Quote :
New Zealand's fastest growing industry,"

big dairy profits? or monetary policy inflating prices? milk exported?
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Sun Mar 16, 2014 2:14 pm

Big Dairy profits, insatiable world demand for dairy products, languishing sheep meat prices, nepotism, cronyism, price fixing, profit scouring, undercutting etc etc being the name of the game in the meat co-operatives board rooms - there is only one big Dairy Co-operative - Fonterra (several small players but they have to buy most of their milk from Fonterra, or Fonterra has to buy their surplus), unlike the meat industry which has two major farmer owned co-operatives, one privately owned large company and several smaller privately owned processors. The two large co-operatives fight tooth and nail for market share and gladly undercut each other when selling their shareholders products, to the UK supermarkets especially - they appear to have made a fine art out of squandering their shareholders funds. One of the two Co-operatives was involved in an epic hostile takeover (of a third - two co-operatives became one - two massive egos got in the way of common sense) which cost over $70million in legal fees etc which the resulting large co-operative has then taken from their shareholders profits over the last ten years - they crow about how much they had reduced their debt - yeah right - all they have done is move it onto their farmer clients balance sheet by stealing their lambs from them. Where they set their price per kilo the other larger co-operative and smaller operators follow - why wouldn't they? - one owner of a smaller company managed to buy 27,000 ha in the South Island at the same time as lamb prices were at a record low ........................................

There is much hand wringing and anxiety about the sheep meat industry, lots of talk, the same old directors being elected to the boardroom and even more conversions of prime sheep (and cattle finishing land) into dairy farms - 90 alone this year in the South Island - 40 just in Southland a traditional sheep power house. Ewe numbers are down 5 million on what was estimated on an already decimated flock (lowest since 1950's apparently) For every 2 sheep and beef farms converted another one goes into dairy support ie supplement feed growing, heifer grazing or herd wintering off. My guess is that at least another quarter of a million ewes have been killed as "surplus to requirements" since that 5 million less was decided on. The meat companies, as short sighted as always, are paying almost as much per kilo for ewes as they are for prime lambs - seemingly the Chinese cannot get enough mutton.

There is still much of NZ which is only suited to running breeding cows and ewes, the progeny then being sold as weaners to specialist fatteners - the risk that NZ faces is that the running of dairy stock or actually converting (multi million dollar exercise - a dairy shed alone is getting into the millions, plus extra staff housing, races, fencing and WATER systems) is a much more profitable option for all of that land and there is no market for store (requiring finishing) stock - the only sheep and beef farmers that will be profitable will be those that have enough decent land which can grow good grass so they can fatten their own stock as the price for land which is even remotely suitable for the dairy industry has a premium added to it's value. As I have previously mentioned those that have been breeding beef (specifically Angus) cattle which are easy keeping, fatten on the smell of grass and can climb to the top of the hill will not be so affected (no guarantee that we won't all be affected in long run) but those that have specialised in high performance = high maintenance cattle and not paid enough attention to structural soundness (and there are several who fall into that category) and have made a market of selling bulls into softer (more likely dairy suitable) country will perhaps feel the effects sooner. Either way there are some big questions to be answered about NZ's agricultural future and the wisdom of a country already heavily dependent on agriculture becoming almost entirely dependent on one facet of agriculture for the Gross Domestic Product and balance of payments. Meanwhile since that farm sold for $65m there have probably been countless other contracts signed on land that currently has sheep or beef cows - NZ is traditionally a nation of agricultural band wagon jumpers.
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Wed Mar 19, 2014 8:52 pm

Megan, what is your A and B mob differentiation? something we could all argue about?  Very Happy Very Happy 
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Thu Mar 20, 2014 12:51 am

It is an ambiguous way of describing them A and B as they are both treated the same except one mob runs on good country close to home and the other has the better country at the back of the station (flats as opposed to mountains). Smile 

All the bulls are run as one mob after weaning (except obvious steer options - those that have displayed excessive flightiness, those whose mothers have totally p'od us during calving time Evil or Very Mad , abandoned twins, orphans, structural issues or scrotal size - last year they numbered 10 out of a record bull calf drop of 90) the remaining 80 were wintered on a kale crop at the back of the farm while the front of the farm was occupied by calving cows. When the cows have been mobbed up into mating mobs and sent on their way the heaviest, or those out of the best cows (even if they are not the heaviest due to age or whatever, anecdotally we know they will be up with the earliest in catalogue) are brought to the front of the farm - usually around 25 or so as we do not have enough grazing or paddock sizes to cope with a mob of 80 - they would need shifting every day - also bear in mind that we keep the hooligans bounce  until they are nearly 2, when they are sold at auction, - in catalogue order which starts at 1 (from the A mob) and ends at about 50 (54 this year) from the B mob - management on sale day necessitates that the two mobs are yarded together in their mob groups but with the two groups unable to get to close to each other - for obvious reasons when dealing with 2 year old bulls Rolling Eyes .

From a couple of days before the sale to the last bull being trucked to his new home all the R 2 bulls are at the front of the farm and if the crop or new grass being saved for them is ready the mob of yearling bulls are moved out to the back - in the meantime they are somewhere in the middle of the property out of mischief. Their sisters are also sent out the back in another area and wintered on a kale crop too.

It is purely a management method that has worked for the last 17 years that we have been running the stud. The number of cows has steadily increased as have the number of bulls sold - I think from memory the entire catalogue at my first sale in 1997 was 24 bulls. The bigger mobs necessitate different management and some studs in NZ would have several smaller mobs than we do - people who visit to view the bulls before the sale, both stud and commercial, often comment favourably on the mob sizes being larger than they are used to seeing. Hopefully there will be much discussion and not to much argument  Very Happy 
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Thu Mar 20, 2014 8:37 am

Quote :
(except obvious steer options - those that have displayed excessive flightiness, those whose mothers have totally p'od us during calving time Evil or Very Mad , abandoned twins, orphans, structural issues or scrotal size - last year they numbered 10 out of a record bull calf drop of 90)

Just curious: do you cull the 10 cows, too? How much consideration is given to the sire(s) in traits such as flightiness, SC, structure, ...? The kale crop: is it interseeded with residual grass or a pure stand?
Back to top Go down
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Thu Mar 20, 2014 3:27 pm

Good question Eddie - depends on the reason for steering or culling the heifer - if it is because the cow was a pain at calving then yes, if the structural problem or temperament is a recurring theme then yes. Calving difficulties - dependent on the degree of severity and again if a recurring theme for that cow or even her family line - then yes. Kicked off twins - no and orphans, the decision is taken out of our hands  Sad 
Poor mothering - yes, failure to thrive - yes. For all instances beyond our scope of expectation which does not warrant definite culling then the cow is noted and given one strike - they are never allowed two.

This is the third year we have used kale - the crops are also used in pasture development so the paddocks where the pasture is poorest, been taken over by the natives and hardy less palatable species or eaten out by Porina (native moth caterpillar - voracious and loves rye grass and clover!) before we started spraying annually for it - one year crop, next year new grass and then on to the next bit. This year and last the bull's crop paddocks have rough sidings which run the length of the paddocks and are on a 70 deg gradient - not cultivatable - they bulls have access to that grass and then we leave a gate open so they can get off the inevitable mud to lie down and also graze - if we think they need more roughage we either use the motorbike to bring hay from a nearby shed or take bales of wrapped silage out to them. Not ideal as the tractor makes a mess getting to and from there and is well occupied keeping the held up pregnant cows fed with the same silage supply at the front of the farm.

The heifers cropping area is right near the hay shed which has racks attached so they have daily hay, crop and also same thing a gate open to grass. Both mobs are behind a tape and given a break every day. We build a semi permanent warratah standard and two wire electric to break up the bull's area into two as the deer come through and knock down the fences - if the chewed tapes are not enough of a pain at least we can limit the damage to half the crop only if the bulls start stampeding - something about the deer smell really gets them going! At the moment we are not getting enough power out there to even consider the electrics keeping the bulls especially behind tapes - massive short somewhere on the kilometres of wire between unit and there - have spent two days looking already and nada - tedious is not the word for it - the tester and fault finder are not being much help at all  Evil or Very Mad 

We experimented with two different kale varieties last year and used the same leafier, less stalk species over the two paddocks this year - 1800 or so male white faced lambs were run over both the kale crops during the summer - last grazing three weeks ago - they eat all the foliage and the plan is that it will be regrown adequately for the cattle by July - looking promising so far and fert truck coming in next day or two. We sent over 600 of those lambs to the sale yards yesterday and estimate it added $10 to their value - good return on the dollars required to cultivate the crop already.
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Thu Mar 20, 2014 6:48 pm

Sorry - didn't touch on sire - if a whole crop of calves shows the same tendencies then sires called into question - we try to select sires on temperament so rarely does a wholesale problem occur - if the odd one crops up it can be put down to a bad cross and we do not repeat the mating - if the next years calf is touchy too them the cow gets the blame fair and square
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Thu Mar 20, 2014 9:53 pm

pukerimu wrote:
Sorry - didn't touch on sire - if a whole crop of calves shows the same tendencies then sires called into question - we try to select sires on temperament so rarely does a wholesale problem occur - if the odd one crops up it can be put down to a bad cross and we do not repeat the mating - if the next years calf is touchy too them the cow gets the blame fair and square

Thanks for the details. The short in fences really gets to be irritating. I have a fault finder and it helps. If all else fails I put on a headlight and walk the fence on a dark night to look for sparks. But none of this, "It was a dark and stormy night..." business! Me, storms and fences don't mix. I tried that a few years ago when the first part of a storm put a big oak on the perimeter fence and all of the cows go out. About the time I got them tolled back in and moved them into an adjoining pasture the second wave of the storm unexpectedly arrived. I had to get them secured or they would have been right back off of the property. The lightning would pop, a non-electric fence that I was trying to close would zing, and it would thunder. It did that a few times and then the lightning got a tree off to my left. I decided that timing was an issue. So, I let it lightning, wait for the pop or zing, I'd do something with the gate for a second and jump back for the next strike. Got done and lived to tell the story but lost two more trees besides the blowdown. No firewood shortage here.

Eddie, ask me the time and I'll tell you how to make a watch
Back to top Go down
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Fri Mar 21, 2014 3:54 pm

Electric fences and sheep are right up there with my least favourite thing - we have double deer gates (7ft - hurricane netting, tubular steel) at a main gateway which are sometimes live and sometimes not - for the life of us cannot find where the power is leaking to fix it - sometimes a tingle and sometimes a belt which makes you jump and yell! Lots of trees near or on fencelines, lots of top up netting which can hook up on the hot wire. It is 7km out to the back of the farm as a crow flies - I guess (real gestimate - could be out by hundred's - not less though shouldn't think) there is about 170 km of hot wire or more when you take in the circumference of individual paddocks. You and your head lamp most welcome Eddie cheers 
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
PatB



Posts : 352
Join date : 2010-09-25
Age : 53
Location : Turner, Maine

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Fri Mar 21, 2014 6:17 pm

Can you isolate different sections of the fence for testing? I try to set the fence up so I can isolate sections to make it easier to find shorts.
Back to top Go down
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Fri Mar 21, 2014 9:50 pm

There are many switches on the fence line and they are useful most of the time to isolate faults - yesterday we switched over the fences to the other unit (which powers the front of the farm) so one unit is powering the whole place - wondering now whether the other unit (which starts to squeal if turned off and then back on, squealing stops after it has been on for a while, that is has a major earth somewhere) is not faulty as the power seems to be much better out the back on the one unit - will take it into town for servicing and then go back over the main lead out fences with a fine tooth comb and maybe even the headlamp  Smile thinking that the fault is close to home as the arrows point definitely in one direction on the fault finder but then disappear as you get further out the back - just the short reading, no directional help - of course at this time of year there is much grass on the fences which cause a multitude of shorts - again electric fences ................. not my favourite thing! If there was room in the budget I'd rip the whole lot out and start again with logical placement of switches and isolators - we have been on this property for 6 years and believe you me there has not been much logic, common sense or long term planning in anything that has been put on the place in the last 25 before then - our fencing budget is pretty much consumed with keeping the fences on the hills and ridges intact and stock (sheep) proof - some bright spark has topped up the 8 wire batten and post fences with deer netting - no new long posts mind you - on no, the cheapest and quickest way to do the job is to use deer fence battens and staple them on the existing wire - we get storm force winds regularly at the tops of some ridges - does not take an Einstein to work out what happens to old wires fences when something top heavy is being buffeted by the wind - broken wires and missing staples in all directions - the wind is so severe in places that the entire posts have gouged out a ditch in which they happily swing back and forwards. We love it here but scratch our heads constantly at some of the handiwork (now that is an oxymoron if ever!!)
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
Grassfarmer



Posts : 714
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Fri Mar 21, 2014 10:15 pm

Different country, similar problems. We started the winter bale grazing at the far end of our fence with 5700 v and finished up running precisely 0 v. Don't know how many miles of fence we have under how many feet of snow but thus far I haven't had the ambition to go fix it. Luckily the cows haven't had any ambition to wander either. Kinda hoping for some thawing here soon - had a warm 10 day spell there that sunk it from 2 feet to about 20 inches. 3 weeks till our first calves come and I'm not optimistic we are going to see any bare ground.
Eddie can you come with your headlamp and see if you can melt some snow?
Back to top Go down
http://www.luingcattle.com
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Sat Mar 22, 2014 2:26 am

Pretty sure we would not swap our grass shorts for your snow Grassfarmer - we hope it starts to thaw soon!!!!
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Sat Mar 22, 2014 8:07 am

Grassfarmer wrote:
Different country, similar problems. We started the winter bale grazing at the far end of our fence with 5700 v and finished up running precisely 0 v. Don't know how many miles of fence we have under how many feet of snow but thus far I haven't had the ambition to go fix it. Luckily the cows haven't had any ambition to wander either. Kinda hoping for some thawing here soon - had a warm 10 day spell there that sunk it from 2 feet to about 20 inches. 3 weeks till our first calves come and I'm not optimistic we are going to see any bare ground.
Eddie can you come with your headlamp and see if you can melt some snow?

I guess I would need a tunneling shovel to check the lower wires? Mike can probably come up with a Robert Frost or some famed poet with a poem about a walk in the woods at night while checking an electric fence to let you know the extras involved in the effort; A bit like coon hunting.

A Walk in the Woods at Night

I walk alone with all light gone
Along a fence where power is not strong
There are no faces, no scenes, no sight
Except where I aim my trusty light

Walk, I do, and think and look
If this is all that, in life, it took
To farm, to live, to win, to be
Wouldn't it be nice for all to see

But me, yes me, I'm working here
Nothing purely poetic of this walk, so dear
I'm looking for a special and hidden short
"That's it!", is my lonely and dark retort

I turn, and home, I surely head
The walk is over; it's time for bed
Tomorrow's chore will wait for light
To fix the short I found last night.


Back to top Go down
Tom D
Admin


Posts : 482
Join date : 2010-09-25
Age : 38
Location : Michigan

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Sat Mar 22, 2014 8:39 am

EddieM wrote:
Grassfarmer wrote:
Different country, similar problems. We started the winter bale grazing at the far end of our fence with 5700 v and finished up running precisely 0 v. Don't know how many miles of fence we have under how many feet of snow but thus far I haven't had the ambition to go fix it. Luckily the cows haven't had any ambition to wander either. Kinda hoping for some thawing here soon - had a warm 10 day spell there that sunk it from 2 feet to about 20 inches. 3 weeks till our first calves come and I'm not optimistic we are going to see any bare ground.
Eddie can you come with your headlamp and see if you can melt some snow?

I guess I would need a tunneling shovel to check the lower wires?  Mike can probably come up with a Robert Frost or some famed poet with a poem about a walk in the woods at night while checking an electric fence to let you know the extras involved in the effort; A bit like coon hunting.

A Walk in the Woods at Night

I walk alone with all light gone
Along a fence where power is not strong
There are no faces, no scenes, no sight
Except where I aim my trusty light

Walk, I do, and think and look
If this is all that, in life, it took
To farm, to live, to win, to be
Wouldn't it be nice for all to see

But me, yes me, I'm working here
Nothing purely poetic of this walk, so dear
I'm looking for a special and hidden short
"That's it!", is my lonely and dark retort

I turn, and home, I surely head
The walk is over; it's time for bed
Tomorrow's chore will wait for light
To fix the short I found last night.



Best dam Post I ever seen. Period. Absolutely nuthin left to say. cheers  cheers  cheers  Except....... that's just beautiful, Eddie.  Very Happy  You really brought a teer to this old fence fixers eye.  Sad  I once had a good old cow that I got from out west, she would find the shorts in the fence and stand there and moo until I could get there to make the repair. She was the BOSS, and she wouldn't let any of the other cows stray, she kept them with the HERD. Else she stomped em to death! Best dam cow I ever had.

Back to top Go down
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Sat Mar 22, 2014 9:09 am

Tom D wrote:
EddieM wrote:
Grassfarmer wrote:
Different country, similar problems. We started the winter bale grazing at the far end of our fence with 5700 v and finished up running precisely 0 v. Don't know how many miles of fence we have under how many feet of snow but thus far I haven't had the ambition to go fix it. Luckily the cows haven't had any ambition to wander either. Kinda hoping for some thawing here soon - had a warm 10 day spell there that sunk it from 2 feet to about 20 inches. 3 weeks till our first calves come and I'm not optimistic we are going to see any bare ground.
Eddie can you come with your headlamp and see if you can melt some snow?

I guess I would need a tunneling shovel to check the lower wires?  Mike can probably come up with a Robert Frost or some famed poet with a poem about a walk in the woods at night while checking an electric fence to let you know the extras involved in the effort; A bit like coon hunting.

A Walk in the Woods at Night

I walk alone with all light gone
Along a fence where power is not strong
There are no faces, no scenes, no sight
Except where I aim my trusty light

Walk, I do, and think and look
If this is all that, in life, it took
To farm, to live, to win, to be
Wouldn't it be nice for all to see

But me, yes me, I'm working here
Nothing purely poetic of this walk, so dear
I'm looking for a special and hidden short
"That's it!", is my lonely and dark retort

I turn, and home, I surely head
The walk is over; it's time for bed
Tomorrow's chore will wait for light
To fix the short I found last night.



Best dam Post I ever seen. Period.  Absolutely nuthin left to say. cheers  cheers  cheers  Except....... that's just beautiful, Eddie.  Very Happy  You really brought a teer to this old fence fixers eye.  Sad  I once had a good old cow that I got from out west, she would find the shorts in the fence and stand there and moo until I could get there to make the repair.  She was the BOSS, and she wouldn't let any of the other cows stray, she kept them with the HERD. Else she stomped em to death!  Best dam cow I ever had.

Tom, probably a Longhorn over 20 YO.
Back to top Go down
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Sat Mar 22, 2014 12:33 pm

Grassfarmer wrote:
Different country, similar problems. We started the winter bale grazing at the far end of our fence with 5700 v and finished up running precisely 0 v. Don't know how many miles of fence we have under how many feet of snow but thus far I haven't had the ambition to go fix it. Luckily the cows haven't had any ambition to wander either. Kinda hoping for some thawing here soon - had a warm 10 day spell there that sunk it from 2 feet to about 20 inches. 3 weeks till our first calves come and I'm not optimistic we are going to see any bare ground.
Eddie can you come with your headlamp and see if you can melt some snow?

Grassy, the view from our deck this AM.  How big of a pry bar would it take to get me to go to a land of cold and snow?


Back to top Go down
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Sat Mar 22, 2014 1:55 pm

EddieM wrote:
A Walk in the Woods at Night

I walk alone with all light gone
Along a fence where power is not strong
There are no faces, no scenes, no sight
Except where I aim my trusty light

Walk, I do, and think and look
If this is all that, in life, it took
To farm, to live, to win, to be
Wouldn't it be nice for all to see

But me, yes me, I'm working here
Nothing purely poetic of this walk, so dear
I'm looking for a special and hidden short
"That's it!", is my lonely and dark retort

I turn, and home, I surely head
The walk is over; it's time for bed
Tomorrow's chore will wait for light
To fix the short I found last night.



Absolutely fabulous!!!!!
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
Grassfarmer



Posts : 714
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Sat Mar 22, 2014 6:07 pm

You know Eddie I do believe our grass is longer than yours Very Happy 


Problem is it's last years and we can't get to it. That's a 27"snowshoe Sad 


But I think I found one problem on my fence. Lead out wire is on one side, earth wire on the other - over zealous snow pushing when feeding cows on the other side Rolling Eyes 
Back to top Go down
http://www.luingcattle.com
pukerimu



Posts : 100
Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Thu Mar 27, 2014 12:06 am

When you get snow like that do you get days and days of cold, wet snow and then fine, or does the snow come every few days with fine in between, or do you get a blizzard and then deal with the aftermath?
Back to top Go down
http://www.mtmableangus.co.nz
Grassfarmer



Posts : 714
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   Thu Mar 27, 2014 10:02 am

Any and all of those, LOL. This winter we started with a foot on the 2nd November, got a couple more feet in big dumps that month. December I think we only had about 6 days it didn't snow. Had over 6 feet fell by New Year. Since then we have had a lot less precipitation than normal although we have just got @ 8 inches the last couple of days.
I think a more typical pattern is get snow in October/November, getting colder. Get a little snow Dec/Jan very cold. February sometimes mild sometimes snowy. March/April and even into May occasional big dumps of heavy wet snow. We do get lots of days in winter with brilliant sunshine and not a cloud in the sky - that's what makes our climate bearable.

Here is the statistical information for a town close to me.

http://www.eldoradocountyweather.com/canada/climate2/Rocky%20Mountain%20House.html
Back to top Go down
http://www.luingcattle.com
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Competition for land uses   

Back to top Go down
 
Competition for land uses
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Land Transport do the work in transit via Iraq
» TEETH FALLING OUT...LOST IN A FOREIGN LAND???
» Competition law and the monopoly of the market in Kurdistan On: Wednesday 29/2/2012 8:06
» clearing land in Tn
» Chapter 16-Cultivation of a Barren Land (making it fertile)

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Keeney`s Corner :: Whatever-
Jump to: