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 Fertility revisited

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pukerimu



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Join date : 2012-06-02
Location : Norsewood, New Zealand

PostSubject: Re: Fertility revisited   Tue Mar 04, 2014 3:40 am

Jersey bulls figure in the most injuries or fatalities involving cattle in NZ - they are well known for their aggressiveness towards people - of course most are hand reared also.
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MKeeney
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PostSubject: Re: Fertility revisited   Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:28 am

that`s worse than biting the hand that feeds you  Mad  kinda fascinating to have this nice, friendly little milk cow whose daddy is a brute...why?
another thing about the jersey cow I`ve read...she can birth more calf relative to her size than any breed...

bob long
A few years ago, a gentleman from
Africa, whose experience was largely with
Bos indicus cattle (Zebu influence), gave a
series of lectures in the United States.He
stated that cows must slope from hooks to
pins in order to be easy calvers.
It is true that Bos indicus cattle
(Brahman) have sloping rumps and are easy
calvers. But it is also true that Jersey cattle
are level-rumped and are easy calvers.
Actually,when any cow lies down to
calve, she pulls up her hind legs. This tilts
her pelvis so that she slopes in her rump.
The sloping rump is simply a matter of
posture.


and the current maternal registered rage ?? a big hip  Shocked  Shocked 

here`s a nice powerpoint presentation on calving

http://www.co.yellowstone.mt.gov/extension/ag/presentations/CalvingMt_files/frame.htm

note...Little dystocia variation between breeds with the exception of Jersey and Brahman


could a person tether a jersey bull in a pasture and let the cows come to him like the game chicken breeders do?  Smile 
darn it, every thing has a cost  Mad
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PostSubject: Re: Fertility revisited   Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:31 am

a little Jersey review  Smile 

Ole jumped up  Shocked  "By gollies, eef dat purple ting vork, I figger out dat Daisy Mae x Li'l Abner ting vood vork bedder, no"    Razz  I didn't ask the grown-up Tom if he preferred  to live in Japan or the UP, so I told Ole to help Tom by practicing what he just learnt.   Wearing his favorite Tom Burke M&M hat on his first consulting job, Ole left knowing Tom was rich cuz he's buying houses in new Zeeland.  Ole told me he was going to tell Tom to pick his choices the popular traditional way based on current $ value output and "nod da vorry bout doze costs"..... that" boneless" organic grass fed ribeyes are selling  @ $16.50#....."bone" in USDA grain fed primes @ $24.00# .....or imported "boneless daily massaged" and beer fed 100% PWagyu @ $110.00#.....and then if Tom really wanted to put some brindled, orange tony tigers in his tank maximizing heterosis, Ole was going to tell Tom to put pale yellow Daisy Mae PJM X's on bottom



with red Li'l Abner PLM Y's on top to achieve MMM (maximized milk and meat) with greater good heterosis than with Shorthorns or Luings to overcome the linkage distances between M & M, especially since PMM's would manage  BW's and improve carcass quality to achieve those higher ribeye values....assured that his milk WW's would contribute to much more than 20% of the genetic bone and muscle growth, and reduce the expected Bozescience variance from 50% to as low as 10% with improved PW parents....that the infinite possibilities are only limited by the actions of those sliding mutations and transduction plasmids during meiosis.  Question  Shocked  



Ole reported back that he finally told Tom "only he kan chuice vitch is bedder on tops or boddems between  ALL DEEZ LINES to fill zee holes of da X for a bedder "endeen".  Wink  .....that he also told Tom about the Lizzie 'n Larry's LL prolific and longevity match, that Lizzie wore a purple top and short tight black skirt like Daisy Mae for positive magnetism.   But Ole said "dere iss a fly in da ointment", that MK just happened to call Tom on the phone interrupting Ole's consultin' session and Mike said he had a gut feeling these tiger cows like this Dylan one below is a perfect cow even in CANADA, butt.....he doubts she can replace herself  ...



Ole sez "Alvays sumting, I dink Messter Mike say dat cuz dis iss a fake Kobe lookin' cow widoze scattery heterosy GCAT's. dat haf doze hiding tranposiductive plasmidy tings. Shocked"....dat Messter Tom is tinking abouts doze $110.00 pound ripeyes cuz he offer da buys me a airplane teeckit to Yapan ta see if doze PKobe cows haf longer heads". Well, I told Olde to just come back home, that bein' a matchmaker for endurance is too difficult with people who can't make up their mind with all the hetero fakeries around, that Tom'll just have to decide for himself if SX yellows will work or not, he can get his Y's, I mean C's from Mr K, O in Ks, F in NZ or SAF in ND.

As I mentioned before, I'm putting my faith in XX&X in accordance with Bozescience to reducin' variation while preservin' variation Shocked ..... figurin' it's less risky than expanding variation of spherical distributions from all those hidden transformations, linkage distances and slippery plasmids. Here on KC my own greater rewards are from seeing attentive students like Ole advance so fast from just a few pictures....and Tom becoming a post laureate earning a place on Briann's wall.... and WT quitting the casinos.....and Craig exceeding his professors with improved black and white illustrative mechanisms to produce predictable colors with clone like precision......it seems almost like MIRACLES from only THREE pure colors locked up in prisms....like seeing how faces turn red from embarrassment or anger, or turning white from fright seeing ghostly spirits. Shocked
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PostSubject: Re: Fertility revisited   Wed Mar 05, 2014 8:31 pm


Ireland’s largest beef cow fertility research under way


By Lisa Deeney on February 13, 2014





There is clear evidence of a decline in the reproductive efficiency of Irish beef cow herds, according to Teagasc, and it is now undertaking a large-scale research to examine this issue in detail.

It highlights for example, that annually only about eight calves are born for every 10 cows; less than 25 per cent of cows produce a calf every 365 days; the interval between successive calvings for the average cow is about six weeks longer than it should be; and, less than 10 per cent of heifers calve for the first time at two years of age.
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pukerimu



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PostSubject: Re: Fertility revisited   Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:53 pm

I would be interested to see the statistics that they are measuring the decline against, what time period etc.

This seems to be a common theme in cattle breeding all around the world at the moment - we are not exempt from the hand wringing from the "experts" in NZ - from our perspective we do not see any declining fertility in either ours or our bull buying clients herds - however obviously there has been a national trend - would be very interesting to look at the timeline and determine whether there is any correlation between when the "experts" started professing the way to increase farmer profitability (including chasing genetic trends) and the global decline in cow production.  Think that 036 and his lethal defect carrying buddies probably can shoulder some blame - in the Angus herd at least.

Bigger is not necessarily better, heavy weaners do not mean higher profitability if you are forsaking a calf the following year to do it and all the figures in the world do not necessarily result in a calf on the ground - personally I believe that you can increase your chances by using a bull in a natural mating cycle who was in turn sired by a bull in a natural mating cycle who was in turn also sired by a bull in a natural mating cycle etc etc etc - if you look at the pedigrees of some cattle it has been 4 to 5, or even more, generations since a bull successfully mounted and impregnated a cow which resulted in a live calf - ET and A/I in the right hands a powerful tool and are all very well, but they can also disguise fundamental flaws in operating equipment, structure, libido and temperament - all vitally important components of a successful cow/calf operation.
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Grassfarmer



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PostSubject: Re: Fertility revisited   Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:38 am

I wouldn't read too much into the Irish situation, it's not a big, business or production orientated industry like you encounter in north America or Australasia. Average farm size is @80 acres and half their income comes from direct Government subsidy. The little smallholdings on the west coast of Ireland were like the crofts in Scotland. They maybe had 6 cows, a garden plot and some other form of employment. For years these places would sell their 2 or 3 heifers a year to Irish cattle dealers who gathered them up and shipped groups of them to Scotland. Originally they were "Irish Blues" the product of an Angus bull on a Shorthorn based, mongrelized dual purpose milk cow.
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pukerimu



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PostSubject: Re: Fertility revisited   Thu Mar 06, 2014 1:39 pm

Interesting then that in a phone conversation last night with an attendee at the NZ Beef and Lamb warm up meeting to, hopefully, a large and partially Government funded effort to determine "what the best genetics for hill country farming in NZ" might be (yes I know 20 years of Breedplan and we still haven't been able to work it out ................. well, perhaps the biggest fans of Breedplan are struggling with that - as for the folk who have continued to breed cattle for their own hill country and hill country farming clients ..............most of the answers are "elementary my dear") he mentioned that the Irish example was held up.

Perhaps because the herds are so small the decline in fertility is more noticeable / marked and also easily measured - my gut would tell me that the results would probably be reflected, to varying degrees, in all herds, large or small, no matter what breed, where breeding principles deviated from the "real" economic traits to chase those "estimated values" or "expected differences" that someone else has told breeders are important.
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Grassfarmer



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PostSubject: Re: Fertility revisited   Thu Mar 06, 2014 2:53 pm

I question how much "breeding principles" factor into it with the guys with 6 cows or 20 cows. I would guess rather than number chasing these guys will be suffering more from the effects of the change in dairy herd genetics. Like your NZ example of moving from "real" beef breeds to angus x dairy cows that would sure herd herd fertility. In Europe it is more pronounced because the Friesian, Ayrshire, Dairy Shorthorn have largely been ditched in favour of Holsteins.
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RobertMac



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PostSubject: Re: Fertility revisited   Thu Mar 06, 2014 7:42 pm

You are right Ms. Megan, it's elementary. Keep cows that breed every year for you and use bulls out of the best of them. No Government funded research is going to say that. Research papers are job justification for the authors and almost always conclude with the need for more study and more funding.

Chasing "E" numbers, weight, fat, and hide color aren't going to help profits when it comes at the cost of fertility.
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