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 stockpiled fescue and daily poliwire move

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Grassfarmer



Posts : 714
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: stockpiled fescue and daily poliwire move   Wed Aug 20, 2014 10:00 pm

EddieM wrote:


For df:
article wrote:
Monitor roadsides and manage your pastures to try to reproduce what grows there

I find this odd to try to make fertilized pastures to be like unfertilized and ungrazed road shoulders.

Seeing what grows on the roadsides often gives an indication of what the land is capable of producing where poor management (inside the fence) hasn't been able to reach. It is biased though as it removes animal impact and from that point of view I'd be wary of picking the species that do well on the roadside and assuming they will do best under grazing.
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df



Posts : 549
Join date : 2010-09-28

PostSubject: Re: stockpiled fescue and daily poliwire move   Wed Aug 20, 2014 10:06 pm

EddieM wrote:
RobertMac wrote:
Eddie, how did your summer forage test turn out?

The sheep are still rotating on the mixture.  The sunflower portion was the least useful but was a test only based on Ray Archeletta's comments.  The millets and sudangrass have done very well.  Since the sheep have parasite resistance the rotation periods have been short but to manage the forage rather that to minimize parasites.  I just wish that I had planted it earlier in the year but we were so dry for much of that period.  The earlier planting would have been better for the iron clay peas.  I guess it was because of the peas but the deer have been true pests with the plantings.  But they are true pests with just about anything that grows.

For df:
article wrote:
Monitor roadsides and manage your pastures to try to reproduce what grows there

I find this odd to try to make fertilized pastures to be like unfertilized and ungrazed road shoulders.  

I have enjoyed some of the research of Dr. Don Ball and others on both the effects of fungus infected fescue but also the economics of it.  Add some legumes and it provides the best return.  I think that the studies are in the "Southern Forages" book.

My take was that Cooke had not had much success with varieties of forages that don't naturally grow in his road ditches. He does lime but does not fertilize with N, P or K. Cooke likes fescue at times but prefers tall warm-season forages for much of the year. He claims the cattle are seldom protein deficient but are often energy deficient.

One of his basic management goals is to be prepared for drought. Thus, he likes long rotations which allow the plants to have deep root systems.
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df



Posts : 549
Join date : 2010-09-28

PostSubject: Re: stockpiled fescue and daily poliwire move   Wed Aug 20, 2014 10:08 pm

Cooke has a lot of Johnsongrass and would like more. However, it is illegal to plant in TN.

With proper management, Johnsongrass will spread. It is fairly easy to grow but under most management will get grazed out.
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EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: stockpiled fescue and daily poliwire move   Thu Aug 21, 2014 7:51 am

df wrote:
EddieM wrote:
RobertMac wrote:
Eddie, how did your summer forage test turn out?

The sheep are still rotating on the mixture.  The sunflower portion was the least useful but was a test only based on Ray Archeletta's comments.  The millets and sudangrass have done very well.  Since the sheep have parasite resistance the rotation periods have been short but to manage the forage rather that to minimize parasites.  I just wish that I had planted it earlier in the year but we were so dry for much of that period.  The earlier planting would have been better for the iron clay peas.  I guess it was because of the peas but the deer have been true pests with the plantings.  But they are true pests with just about anything that grows.

For df:
article wrote:
Monitor roadsides and manage your pastures to try to reproduce what grows there

I find this odd to try to make fertilized pastures to be like unfertilized and ungrazed road shoulders.  

I have enjoyed some of the research of Dr. Don Ball and others on both the effects of fungus infected fescue but also the economics of it.  Add some legumes and it provides the best return.  I think that the studies are in the "Southern Forages" book.

My take was that Cooke had not had much success with varieties of forages that don't naturally grow in his road ditches.  He does lime but does not fertilize with N, P or K.  Cooke likes fescue at times but prefers tall warm-season forages for much of the year.  He claims the cattle are seldom protein deficient but are often energy deficient.  

One of his basic management goals is to be prepared for drought.  Thus, he likes long rotations which allow the plants to have deep root systems.

We probably started out with worse soils as cotton was here for 100+ years and most topsoil is in the Charleston harbor. The roadsides here are mainly bahiagrass which I do not mind in a pasture or two for drought relief but it alone would but me into 0 grazing in the winter. My father did all he could to keep separate winter and summer pastures: pretty much monoculture efforts with a twist or two. That had it's time during the days of cheaper fertilizer. I lime for the benefit of legumes and have used poultry litter at times to "stockpile" P and K in the soil. I still have what I call "winter pastures" because they have more fescue and are in locations that are helpful to me for winter and calving. There are "summer pastures" with a good bit of fescue in them. If the grazing and season works right, the regrowth of fescue in the late fall is used to keep replacement heifers.

Pastures now are what grasses they want to be. Legumes are ample to overabundant depending on the microenvironments that I do not understand. I add some legume seeds from time to time. Weeds are impressively vigorous but it is a decision to either kill legumes and weeds or tolerate weeds. As the sheep get more of the farm for rotations most weeds will largely become non-issues. If I was smart and organized with free time I would wick some weeds for the sake of aesthetics. Oddly, the ugliest weed is dog fennel and it is the first thing grazed by the guard donkeys in strip grazing after it has been killed by frost. You can hear them crunching on it from several hundred feet away while moving the fence. I comfort myself that it has deep roots and is returning nutrients to the surface. I sleep pretty good at night so I must be right!
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