Keeney`s Corner

A current and reflective discussion of cattle breeding from outside the registered mainstream
 
HomeUsergroupsRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 pedigree value

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : 1, 2  Next
AuthorMessage
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: pedigree value   Sun Nov 10, 2013 7:32 am

does this pedigree mean anything to you?

O,S-Dimethyl acetylphosphoramidothioate
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Sun Nov 10, 2013 2:16 pm

MKeeney wrote:
does this pedigree mean anything to you?

O,S-Dimethyl acetylphosphoramidothioate
smells bad
Back to top Go down
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Sun Nov 10, 2013 4:23 pm

it doesn`t have any less meaning to me than

Career Lodge Lorena Favour Valour Florilla Pamela Perseus Leah Clova Butler Clova Carilla ...I know they are ingredients in a bull; but I don`t know the properties of a single one of them...
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
Tom D
Admin


Posts : 482
Join date : 2010-09-25
Age : 38
Location : Michigan

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Sun Nov 10, 2013 6:42 pm

MKeeney wrote:
does this pedigree mean anything to you?

O,S-Dimethyl acetylphosphoramidothioate

That's a good, clean, pure chemist type pedigree. Generations of solid elements went into the formula of that compound. I noticed it traces back to Hydrogen 10 times, did you know that Hydrogen is one of only 12 elements proven free of all chemical defects?
Back to top Go down
Kent Powell



Posts : 500
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : SW Kansas

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Sun Nov 10, 2013 7:56 pm

No defects? I used to work with hydrogen. Sensitive critters. A little heat and they go -WHOOOOOF. Oxygen just makes it worse.

I hear if you cross them and make Dihydrogen Monoxide it makes a dangerous liquid. Some idiots pour this dangerous combustable and accelerant combination on fires. It should be banned.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yi3erdgVVTw

That pedigree is important.
Back to top Go down
http://powellangus.com
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:23 pm

Kent Powell wrote:
No defects?  I used to work with hydrogen.  Sensitive critters.  A little heat and they go -WHOOOOOF.  Oxygen just makes it worse.

I hear if you cross them and make Dihydrogen Monoxide it makes a dangerous liquid. Some idiots pour this dangerous combustable and accelerant combination on fires.  It should be banned.  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yi3erdgVVTw

That pedigree is important.  
that video is very insightful...helps me understand why some marketers can find 300 people that would give $5200 for bulls...
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Sun Nov 10, 2013 10:29 pm

Kent Powell wrote:
No defects?  I used to work with hydrogen.  Sensitive critters.  A little heat and they go -WHOOOOOF.  Oxygen just makes it worse.

I hear if you cross them and make Dihydrogen Monoxide it makes a dangerous liquid. Some idiots pour this dangerous combustable and accelerant combination on fires.  It should be banned.  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yi3erdgVVTw

That pedigree is important.  
obviously, pedigrees should include warning labels...just to throw a little salt at you Kent, I thought of you when I read this special weather statement...Smile 

OUTDOOR BURNING WILL BE VERY DANGEROUS ON MONDAY...

IT HAS BEEN OVER 72 HOURS SINCE MOST LOCATIONS HAVE SEEN ANY RAINFALL. THIS HAS RESULTED IN VERY DRY AND COMBUSTIBLE LEAF LITTER ACROSS EASTERN KENTUCKY. THE FORECAST FOR MONDAY IS CALLING FOR LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITIES AND WINDS OF 5 TO 10 MPH WITH GUSTS AS HIGH AS 20 MPH EXPECTED IN THE AFTERNOON. THE COMBINATION OF THE DRY GROUND... LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITIES... AND POTENTIAL WIND GUSTS CAN CAUSE A FIRE TO GO OUT OF CONTROL VERY EASILY. ANYONE HIKING OR CAMPING SHOULD TAKE GREAT CARE WITH FIRES OR SMOKING MATERIALS. A REMINDER THAT KENTUCKY LAW DOES NOT PERMIT ANY OUTDOOR BURNING WITHIN 150 FEET OF ANY WOODLAND OR BRUSHLAND BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 6AM TO 6 PM
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
Grassfarmer



Posts : 714
Join date : 2010-09-27
Location : Belmont, Manitoba, Canada

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Sun Nov 10, 2013 11:54 pm

MKeeney wrote:

OUTDOOR BURNING WILL BE VERY DANGEROUS ON MONDAY...

IT HAS BEEN OVER 72 HOURS SINCE MOST LOCATIONS HAVE SEEN ANY RAINFALL. THIS HAS RESULTED IN VERY DRY AND COMBUSTIBLE LEAF LITTER ACROSS EASTERN KENTUCKY. THE FORECAST FOR MONDAY IS CALLING FOR LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITIES AND WINDS OF 5 TO 10 MPH WITH GUSTS AS HIGH AS 20 MPH EXPECTED IN THE AFTERNOON. THE COMBINATION OF THE DRY GROUND... LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITIES... AND POTENTIAL WIND GUSTS CAN CAUSE A FIRE TO GO OUT OF CONTROL VERY EASILY. ANYONE HIKING OR CAMPING SHOULD TAKE GREAT CARE WITH FIRES OR SMOKING MATERIALS. A REMINDER THAT KENTUCKY LAW DOES NOT PERMIT ANY OUTDOOR BURNING WITHIN 150 FEET OF ANY WOODLAND OR BRUSHLAND BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 6AM TO 6 PM
You just need a foot of snow like us Mike, that cures the combustibility issue until April Smile
Back to top Go down
http://www.luingcattle.com
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Mon Nov 11, 2013 7:33 am

MKeeney wrote:
it doesn`t have any less meaning to me than

 Career Lodge   Lorena  Favour    Valour  Florilla    Pamela       Perseus   Leah  Clova   Butler   Clova    Carilla ...I know they are ingredients in a bull; but I don`t know the properties of a single one of them...
back to the pedigree...I can add "of Wye" to each of the above names; and now they have a bit more meaning...for while we can`t be familiar with individuals unless we own/use them, several of us have a little knowledge about the overall program or selection direction...though I must say, "sometimes for me "a little" might be a stretch ...for old bulls of the past make no sense to me; unless it is merely for rarity marketing...
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
Kent Powell



Posts : 500
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : SW Kansas

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:10 am

That is also the reason many use the same young bull.

Back to top Go down
http://powellangus.com
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Mon Nov 11, 2013 7:56 pm

MKeeney wrote:
MKeeney wrote:
it doesn`t have any less meaning to me than

 Career Lodge   Lorena  Favour    Valour  Florilla    Pamela       Perseus   Leah  Clova   Butler   Clova    Carilla ...I know they are ingredients in a bull; but I don`t know the properties of a single one of them...
back to the pedigree...I can add "of Wye" to each of the above names; and now they have a bit more meaning...for while we can`t be familiar with individuals unless we own/use them, several of us have a little knowledge about the overall program or selection direction...though I must say, "sometimes for me "a little" might be a stretch ...for old bulls of the past make no sense to me; unless it is merely for rarity marketing...
What is the range of ages when bulls are good and useful and before they become useless? Is only a currently living bull out in the pasture to be used as what? Current, better, lesser, more? I'd bet that you know enough about some of these "of Wye" listed above to NOT use them! Are all sires and dams of current animals in the current herd worse individuals that the current herd?

A lot of ingredients in your recipe. What if the pedigree was just Valour/ Leah? Or Butler/Clova and back to Butler for the two generations? Does decreasing a width or variety of an animal's background do more than slightly unshuffle a pedigree or does it give us a chance to know more about the potential offspring or to at least expect less variability?
Back to top Go down
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:16 pm

I can remember three Wye bulls...Arnaud, Amerson, and Proteus; I owned them...I don`t remember a single daughter as being memorable...that might be because I didn`t know what a good cow was...I had one calf weigh over 400 lb in 1976; so, I knew I wasn`t getting what I wanted...
but the problem might have been grass

Kent reminded me the other day that in 2009 at 5barx I said

two lbs of ladino clover per acre will raise weaning weights more than any bull in the Angus breed...

how long did Wye last in the registered mainstream? not long

that`s the nice thing about selling nostalgia, the older it gets, the more dear it becomes...
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:45 pm

Quote :
What is the range of ages when bulls are good and useful and before they become useless? Is only a currently living bull out in the pasture to be used as what? Current, better, lesser, more?
Do all home raised bulls breed alike? Aren't young bulls used for the first time not "acts of faith"?

How proven does a home raised bull need to be before he is "good"? What causes him to become useless if he was good as a living bull but he is gets old and joins the old dead bull club?

I see that Wye has a glass ceiling on average weaning weights as they brought back the old bulls and things are still the same. If they are going to be a low growth herd or source (surely not a line or lines), then are they useful to select for a maternal base?
Back to top Go down
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Mon Nov 11, 2013 10:37 pm

EddieM wrote:
Quote :
What is the range of ages when bulls are good and useful and before they become useless? Is only a currently living bull out in the pasture to be used as what? Current, better, lesser, more?
Do all home raised bulls breed alike?  Aren't young bulls used for the first time not "acts of faith"?

How proven does a home raised bull need to be before he is "good"?  What causes him to become useless if he was good as a living bull but he is gets old and joins the old dead bull club?

I see that Wye has a glass ceiling on average weaning weights as they brought back the old bulls and things are still the same.  If they are going to be a low growth herd or source (surely not a line or lines), then are they useful to select for a maternal base?  
come, come there, dear chap, haven`t you learned anything from the big jammer...PERFORMANCE FIRST Cool
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Tue Nov 12, 2013 8:18 am

MKeeney wrote:
EddieM wrote:
Quote :
What is the range of ages when bulls are good and useful and before they become useless? Is only a currently living bull out in the pasture to be used as what? Current, better, lesser, more?
Do all home raised bulls breed alike?  Aren't young bulls used for the first time not "acts of faith"?

How proven does a home raised bull need to be before he is "good"?  What causes him to become useless if he was good as a living bull but he is gets old and joins the old dead bull club?

I see that Wye has a glass ceiling on average weaning weights as they brought back the old bulls and things are still the same.  If they are going to be a low growth herd or source (surely not a line or lines), then are they useful to select for a maternal base?  
come, come there, dear chap, haven`t you learned anything from the big jammer...PERFORMANCE FIRST Cool
Spent Saturday at a grassfed beef workshop. Pretty interesting as three guys were from foreign countries: two from Argentina and one from Oregon!! SGF totes the advantages of Argentina. But these guys told what they knew: high inflation, land use shifting to crops, somewhat closed exporting ability, low calving rate, lower prices and profit levels that is possibly sustainable, etc. So, I did not see a sorting stick, a T post or some random shots of black cattle sired by a new bull of hope but the room was full of salt of the earth, good commercial, get er'done type folks. There was an aura in the room of goodness without the smell of Iowa.

PERFORMANCE was discussed but mostly as a marker of the forage quality, grazing periods and rotation lengths. But maybe the use of the term "Old Dead Bull" has two meanings: One for hype of what is not and was not there and one for a bull that can be woven into the fabric of the herd for decades to fortify the traits that made him useful in the first place. Or do all bulls have a timed fuse of goodness?

Larry lightly suggested that some of his non-DD registerable semen might be a teaser to get his one owner EEE tennis shoes off of the auction block. Are there not any straws of that semen that would start the improvements to the mangled herd of a mainstream dreamer who quit counting sheep and started to think?
Back to top Go down
tim hair



Posts : 9
Join date : 2012-04-16

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Tue Nov 12, 2013 1:29 pm

2# of clover will make as much genetic improve as most people can stand in the south east.
Back to top Go down
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:24 pm

tim hair wrote:
2# of  clover will make as much genetic improve as most people can stand in the south east.
If they will believe what they are told and do soil tests and put out the needed lime.
Back to top Go down
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Thu Nov 14, 2013 7:24 am

the con-voy wants it both ways...use the AI hottest bulls, while pretending to be an in herd breeder...

Quote :
There are 7 generations of home raised cows in her pedigree covering a period of 40 years. Shows how slow this cattle breeding deal is but also how satisfying it can be to watch that young cow and be able to remember all those cows in her back ground
7 generations of home raised cows means one thing for certain...you ain`t young Exclamation but a 7 generation Tru-line breeder would know all the cows the sires were out of as well...
but knowing seven generations of cows means nothing if the selection was for maximums and corrections and terminal and  maternal etc inclucing names that scare a maternal breeder to death...Future Direction, GT Maximum, Hoff Valedictorian, Mytty out of Focus, etc ...the trait selection lines would look like a polygraph test...



so I guess pedigree could be important to show that often what is implied, isn't  so...but if selection is the same , especially in a closed herd, no pedigree is needed...the pedigree is in the name...
young breeders could build more prepotency in 3 generations and 15 years, than those without a constant course can do in a lifetime...and several have bought 20 years worth of time to hasten that quest...
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
Kent Powell



Posts : 500
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : SW Kansas

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Thu Nov 14, 2013 8:29 am

Broke down yesterday, so I went back into the pedigree of indexes.

This sounds familiar:


http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0388_seedstock%201.pdf

"The future definition of "better"
Today, in the mid-1980s, seed stock producers are
becoming more appreciative of this fact. We now have a
"systems perspective." We know that intermediate levels of
performance for traits like milk production, birth weight,
and mature size are optimal, that efficiency results from a
delicate balance of many traits interacting with
environmental factors, and that overall genetic merit is
complex in nature and difficult to quantify. We know
different animals are appropriate in different situations and
that in some cases, efficiency is limited by environment,not genetics."
...

"There's an interesting twist to this situation, however.
Precisely because intermediate levels of a number of traits
are the most efficient, many cattle populations may be
close to genetically optimal already. To be sure, there is
always room for improvement. But in terms of overall
genetic merit, many cattle-if located in the right place
and used in the right way-may be about as good as
cattle can get. If this is the case, we arrive at the
uncomfortable conclusion that maximizing the rate of
genetic change can be a waste of effort. What, then, are
seed stock producers and animal breeding researchers to
do? How do we select breeding cattle under these
circumstances?"

Selection approaches to consider
If we begin with the assumption that the major traits
of growth rate (size) and milk production are near optimal
levels within a herd, it follows there should be a shift in
emphasis away from them. Selection emphasis should be
moved toward the more subtle traits related to adaptability
and convenience, the "fine points." These would include
fertility, soundness, fleshing ability, calving ease,
survivability, and temperament.
...

Despite the shift away from selection for milk and
growth, these traits are still very much present and must
be dealt with. There will be a fundamental change in the
approach to selection, however. Breeders will be selecting
from the "middle" for these traits. No longer will the eye catching,
extreme calf be the one that is kept as a herd
sire. The herd sire will be relatively nondescript.
Psychologically, making the transition to this type of
selection may be very difficult for many breeders. There is
some consolation, however, in knowing that although it may appear
only average animals are being selected, in terms of genetics merit,
the best animals are being selected


http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0397aj_beeflogic.pdf


High EPDs not always best in genetic improvement

EPDs are not a measure of value.

However, when consistency-not change-is the goal,
accuracy of evaluation becomes critical. This implies
heavier use of older bulls. Selection differentials can be
expected to decline and generation intervals increase.
As breeders turn their attention to the "fine points,"
the adaptability and convenience traits, sire evaluation
should shift its focus also.

As breeding objectives for the major traits are
reached, beef cattle selection will require a whole new way
of thinking. Rapid genetic change will no longer be
important. We will enter a period of "new conservatism"
where extremes are avoided, increasing attention is paid to
accuracy of evaluation, and primary emphasis is on
preventing mistakes. The genetic change that does occur
will be in the areas of adaptability and convenience and
can be expected to be slow.




Back to top Go down
http://powellangus.com
Kent Powell



Posts : 500
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : SW Kansas

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Thu Nov 14, 2013 12:16 pm

If you think making them more alike is simple, boring, or backwards:
 
" />
 
 
If you think things don't change:
 
 
 
" />
 
 
" />
Back to top Go down
http://powellangus.com
larkota



Posts : 310
Join date : 2010-09-23
Age : 57
Location : Kimball South Dakota

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Thu Nov 14, 2013 1:04 pm

Kent Powell wrote:
Broke down yesterday, so I went back into the pedigree of indexes.

This sounds familiar:


http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0388_seedstock%201.pdf

"The future definition of "better"
Today, in the mid-1980s, seed stock producers are
becoming more appreciative of this fact. We now have a
"systems perspective." We know that intermediate levels of
performance for traits like milk production, birth weight,
and mature size are optimal, that efficiency results from a
delicate balance of many traits interacting with
environmental factors, and that overall genetic merit is
complex in nature and difficult to quantify. We know
different animals are appropriate in different situations and
that in some cases, efficiency is limited by environment,not genetics."
...

"There's an interesting twist to this situation, however.
Precisely because intermediate levels of a number of traits
are the most efficient, many cattle populations may be
close to genetically optimal already. To be sure, there is
always room for improvement. But in terms of overall
genetic merit, many cattle-if located in the right place
and used in the right way-may be about as good as
cattle can get. If this is the case, we arrive at the
uncomfortable conclusion that maximizing the rate of
genetic change can be a waste of effort. What, then, are
seed stock producers and animal breeding researchers to
do? How do we select breeding cattle under these
circumstances?"

Selection approaches to consider
If we begin with the assumption that the major traits
of growth rate (size) and milk production are near optimal
levels within a herd, it follows there should be a shift in
emphasis away from them. Selection emphasis should be
moved toward the more subtle traits related to adaptability
and convenience, the "fine points." These would include
fertility, soundness, fleshing ability, calving ease,
survivability, and temperament.
...

Despite the shift away from selection for milk and
growth, these traits are still very much present and must
be dealt with. There will be a fundamental change in the
approach to selection, however. Breeders will be selecting
from the "middle" for these traits. No longer will the eye catching,
extreme calf be the one that is kept as a herd
sire. The herd sire will be relatively nondescript.
Psychologically, making the transition to this type of
selection may be very difficult for many breeders. There is
some consolation, however, in knowing that although it may appear
only average animals are being selected, in terms of genetics merit,
the best animals are being selected


http://www.angusjournal.com/articlepdf/0397aj_beeflogic.pdf


High EPDs not always best in genetic improvement

EPDs are not a measure of value.

However, when consistency-not change-is the goal,
accuracy of evaluation becomes critical. This implies
heavier use of older bulls. Selection differentials can be
expected to decline and generation intervals increase.
As breeders turn their attention to the "fine points,"
the adaptability and convenience traits, sire evaluation
should shift its focus also.

As breeding objectives for the major traits are
reached, beef cattle selection will require a whole new way
of thinking. Rapid genetic change will no longer be
important. We will enter a period of "new conservatism"
where extremes are avoided, increasing attention is paid to
accuracy of evaluation, and primary emphasis is on
preventing mistakes. The genetic change that does occur
will be in the areas of adaptability and convenience and
can be expected to be slow.





Kent great find. but that is so yesterday and boring. marketing nightmare.

larkota thinking when I grow up I want to be more like Kent.
Back to top Go down
RobertMac



Posts : 262
Join date : 2010-09-28
Location : Mississippi, USA

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Thu Nov 14, 2013 3:53 pm

Quote:
There are 7 generations of home raised cows in her pedigree covering a period of 40 years. Shows how slow this cattle breeding deal is but also how satisfying it can be to watch that young cow and be able to remember all those cows in her back ground


Had to laugh at this. Could not convince the guy that he didn't have a closed herd. Even if he raised all his cows, they were still daughters of AI bulls that he didn't raise and weren't from his herd. And to think he sells semen and doesn't understand this!!! That's when I let my wife convince me I really was wasting my time.

Kent, thinking about those two ads...the kids, raised by the parents following the advise in those ads, turned out to be the "Greatest Generation"! Have we really made progress?
Back to top Go down
EddieM



Posts : 648
Join date : 2010-09-24
Location : South Carolina

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Thu Nov 14, 2013 6:21 pm

MKeeney wrote:
the con-voy wants it both ways...use the AI hottest bulls, while pretending to be an in herd breeder...

Quote :
There are 7 generations of home raised cows in her pedigree covering a period of 40 years. Shows how slow this cattle breeding deal is but also how satisfying it can be to watch that young cow and be able to remember all those cows in her back ground
7 generations of home raised cows means one thing for certain...you ain`t young Exclamation but a 7 generation Tru-line breeder would know all the cows the sires were out of as well...
but knowing seven generations of cows means nothing if the selection was for maximums and corrections and terminal and  maternal etc inclucing names that scare a maternal breeder to death...Future Direction, GT Maximum, Hoff Valedictorian, Mytty out of Focus, etc ...the trait selection lines would look like a polygraph test...



so I guess pedigree could be important to show that often what is implied, isn't  so...but if selection is the same , especially in a closed herd, no pedigree is needed...the pedigree is in the name...
young breeders could build more prepotency in 3 generations and 15 years, than those without a constant course can do in a lifetime...and several have bought 20 years worth of time to hasten that quest...
You missed the point. He has to post anything to be at the top of the list in that category over OT or Mr. Yellow Fat. So, a random picture and some words and he is #1 on the list again. A site for self-inflicted blindness. The same reason that our mamas told us to never run with a pencil, play with a broom or shoot something too hard and close up with a BB gun.

Each site has character. One chases defects, terminal traits and new bulls. This one is made of independents and thinkers. I was away from home too long. I'm ready to scratch me out a spot and have a fit.
Back to top Go down
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Thu Nov 14, 2013 7:20 pm

here`s a pedigree Kent sent me



in this case, they seemed to remember one sire quite well Very Happy
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
MKeeney
Admin


Posts : 4007
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   Thu Nov 14, 2013 10:39 pm

RobertMac wrote:
Quote:
There are 7 generations of home raised cows in her pedigree covering a period of 40 years. Shows how slow this cattle breeding deal is but also how satisfying it can be to watch that young cow and be able to remember all those cows in her back ground


Had to laugh at this. Could not convince the guy that he didn't have a closed herd. Even if he raised all his cows, they were still daughters of AI bulls that he didn't raise and weren't from his herd. And to think he sells semen and doesn't understand this!!! That's when I let my wife convince me I really was wasting my time.

Kent, thinking about those two ads...the kids, raised by the parents following the advise in those ads, turned out to be the "Greatest Generation"! Have we really made progress?
more from the con-voy

Congratulations on the heifer! One of the most satisfying parts of the business is looking at a real good heifer and visualizing the good home raised cows in her pedigree.

good from good is satisfying? must not happen very often in the mainstream...I would prefer to see a good heifer sired by one of my bulls from a damn sorry cow and think what a prepotent sob he is to correct that...
can you believe Windows wants to auto spell correct the word prepotent...evidently, others more than Angus breeders have never heard the word prepotent used

Websters has
pre·po·tent
[ pree pṓt'nt ]

1.more powerful and influential: greater in power, force, or influence
2.showing effective transfer of genetic traits: showing great effectiveness in conferring genetic traits or in fertilization
Back to top Go down
http://www.keeneyscorner.com
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: pedigree value   

Back to top Go down
 
pedigree value
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 2Go to page : 1, 2  Next
 Similar topics
-
» pedigree value

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Keeney`s Corner :: Tru-Line :: Tru-Line-
Jump to: